After RED-S: Road to Recovery

Beyond Limits
Edit
Click here to add content.

After RED-S: Road to Recovery

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

This is the fifth part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

Recovering from RED-S goes beyond the physical symptoms: There is also a mental component.

 

“It was quite hard mentally because it was the start of the season,” professional cyclist Georgia Williams told me about the year she decided to take her health more serious. At the time, she was living in Girona, a town in Spain that’s known for its international cycling community. “I would just walk to the café and see 20 cyclists.”

 

Being confronted with what you’re missing out on every day can be hard on one’s mental health. But Georgia kept reminding herself that her health is more important. After all, her team was so generous to give her all this time off, and she just needed to make the most of it – and then come back stronger.

 

“It was hard, because it was the total opposite of what you’re used to doing,” Georgia said.

 

But only four months later, she was able to get back into training – while continuing her strategy of fueling right before, during, and after every ride.

 

“I think my body needed the initial four months of really stepping back and resting and fueling and gaining back some weight,” Georgia said. Just a little later, her menstrual cycle returned during a training camp in Andorra. “My cycle returned after not too long, considering I didn’t have it for five or six years.”

 

But during her RED-S recovery, she gained back more than her period – there was also some weight gain.

“I was 58 kg to start with and then I got to 65 or 66 kg,” Georgia said. “It’s mentally really hard, too.” 

However, to sustainably recover from RED-S, there is no way around weight gain during the recovery process.

 

“We are very much still at the point where body image or body composition is seen as a performance motor,” said elite sports nutritionist Alicia Edge. “But body composition is not a performance motor. It can absolutely influence performance, but we need to stop measuring it  and saying, ‘You need to lose this much weight or get to this body fat percentage.’”

 

Instead, she suggests thinking about the “why” behind wanting to lose weight. Many athletes are trying to lose weight to improve their performance, but in her work, she often sees the opposite happening.

 

“They’re aiming for body composition goals at the cost of why they wanted them in the first place, which is performance or confidence,” she said.

 

But Alicia feels that the narrative of “smaller means faster” is changing. “It’s changing because of the athletes speaking up about it. Athletes now have a voice, and they have a platform for their voice.”

 

Georgia experienced exactly that. At first, she didn’t speak much about her experience with RED-S, but once she did a few interviews, she started getting a lot of messages on Instagram asking for advice.

“I told them everything I did [in recovery] and what actually helped me,” Georgia said. “And a few months later, they would message me, and they were successful. That was just so rewarding.” 

For example, she found that fueling right before, during, and after training was the most important thing – not only in RED-S recovery, but also in the time after. In her early years as a professional cyclist, she would do countless 3-hour rides without having a snack. But her recovery from RED-S taught her to refuel at the right time.

 

“I never knew about having to eat on a three-hour ride. And I wasn’t too hungry, because my body just got used to it,” Georgia said.

 

RED-S recovery is all about limiting the stress on your body. That’s why Georgia also dedicated most of her free time to relaxation – with plenty of rest days in between her recovery rides. As long as the exercise doesn’t put your body in “stress mode” it’s okay to integrate it into your RED-S recovery plan.

 

“I’d still go for one-hour rides or an hour and a half, but just low intensity, and I’d make sure I’d have food on that ride,” Georgia said.

 

Katie Schofield, who is also a cyclist, had a similar strategy. At the time, in 2014, research about RED-S and possible treatment methods was still in its beginnings, so Katie did a lot of experimenting with herself.

 

“I had the ability to train how I felt I needed to train, so I made it very specific,” Katie said. She would do three weeks of intensive training and then take one week off. She also adapted her training to her menstrual cycle by ramping up intensity and volume around ovulation.

 

Josh Kozelj‘s recovery from RED-S focused mainly on his diet, but also on changing his mindset around food. He allowed himself to eat foods that he had previously cut out of his diet, and retaught himself that it’s okay to have a snack between breakfast and lunch.

 

“It was about adding certain things that I had previously taken away,” Josh said. He also started having a snack right after workouts or a late night snack after dinner.

 

It took about a year until he started feeling better and returned to a normal sleep schedule towards the end of 2019. His motivation also returned and right before COVID-19 hit, he felt like he was “back into the grind.”

 

According to Alicia, a great way to recover from disordered eating is a concept called “RAVES”, which functions as a guideline for helping athletes recover from RED-S and undereating.

“RAVES starts with regularity, adequacy, and then it goes to variety, eating socially and then spontaneity,” said Alicia. 

Athletes who are recovering from an eating disorder start by bringing regularity into their eating habits. The next step from there would be adequacy, then variety – downwards along the RAVES acronym.

 

“But when we’re looking at disordered eating starting to happen, it goes from the S upwards,” said Alicia. “So someone might lose a bit of spontaneity with their food, then they might stop eating out socially.”

 

While RAVES is a great tool, recovery from RED-S looks different for different people. That’s because RED-S isn’t always intentional. For some athletes, it is also situational or accidental, simply because they don’t have enough budget for food or because they don’t know how to fuel themselves properly.

 

“If the reason are those types of things, then our goal is very much around improving the opportunity to eat and improving the knowledge and skill base of how to shop on a budget or how to add more high energy foods in and around training,” Alicia said.

 

Athletes on a plant-based diet are also at an increased risk of developing RED-S because plant food generally contains fewer calories.

 

“So often it’s about eating less clean, because clean eating can definitely lead to accidental entry into low energy availability,” Alicia said.

Post Tags

Nach RED-S: Road to Recovery

Die Behandlung von RED-S umfasst nicht nur die körperlichen Symptome: Es gibt auch eine mentale Komponente.

 

“Es war mental ziemlich schwer, denn es war der Beginn der Saison”, sagte die Profi-Radsportlerin Georgia Williams über das Jahr, in dem sie beschloss, ihre Gesundheit ernster zu nehmen. Damals lebte sie in Girona, einer Stadt in Spanien, die für ihre internationale Radsportgemeinde bekannt ist. “Ich ging einfach ins Café und sah 20 Radfahrer.”


Jeden Tag mit dem konfrontiert zu werden, was man verpasst, kann sich negativ auf die mentale Gesundheit auswirken. Aber Georgia erinnerte sich immer wieder daran, dass ihre Gesundheit wichtiger ist. Schließlich war ihr Team so großzügig, ihr all diese Zeit freizugeben, und sie musste einfach das Beste daraus machen – und dann gestärkt zurückkommen.

 

“Es war schwer, denn es war das totale Gegenteil von dem, was man gewohnt ist”, sagte Georgia.


Aber nur vier Monate später konnte sie wieder mit dem Training beginnen – und dabei ihre Strategie beibehalten, sich vor, während und nach jeder Radtour zu verpflegen.


“Ich glaube, mein Körper brauchte die ersten vier Monate, in denen ich mich wirklich zurückziehen, ausruhen, Kraftstoffe zu mir nehmen und wieder etwas Gewicht zulegen konnte”, sagte Georgia. Wenig später kehrte ihr Menstruationszyklus während eines Trainingslagers in Andorra zurück. “Mein Zyklus kehrte nach nicht allzu langer Zeit zurück, wenn man bedenkt, dass ich ihn fünf oder sechs Jahre lang nicht hatte.”


Aber während ihrer RED-S Genesung hat sie nicht nur ihre Periode zurückbekommen, sondern auch etwas an Gewicht zugelegt.


“Am Anfang wog ich 58 kg, dann kam ich auf 65 oder 66 kg”, sagt Georgia. “Es ist auch mental sehr schwer.”

 

Um sich von RED-S nachhaltig zu erholen, führt jedoch kein Weg an einer Gewichtszunahme während des Erholungsprozesses vorbei.


“Wir befinden uns immer noch an einem Punkt, an dem das Körperbild oder die Körperzusammensetzung als Leistungsmotor angesehen wird”, sagt Alicia Edge, Ernährungswissenschaftlerin im Spitzensport. “Aber die Körperzusammensetzung ist kein Leistungsmotor. Sie kann durchaus die Leistung beeinflussen, aber wir müssen aufhören, sie zu messen und zu sagen: ‘Du musst so viel abnehmen oder diesen Körperfettanteil erreichen.'”


Stattdessen schlägt sie vor, über das “Warum” nachzudenken, das hinter dem Wunsch, Gewicht zu verlieren, steht. Viele Sportler versuchen abzunehmen, um ihre Leistung zu verbessern, aber in ihrer Arbeit sieht sie oft das Gegenteil.


“Sie streben Ziele in Bezug auf die Körperzusammensetzung auf Kosten ihrer eigentlichen Ziele an, nämlich Leistung oder Selbstvertrauen”, sagt sie.


Alicia ist jedoch der Meinung, dass sich die Vorstellung von “dünner ist schneller” ändert. “Es ändert sich, weil die Athleten sich dazu äußern. Die Athleten haben jetzt eine Stimme, und sie haben eine Plattform für ihre Stimme”.


Georgia hat genau das erlebt. Zunächst sprach sie nicht viel über ihre Erfahrungen mit RED-S, aber nachdem sie ein paar Interviews gegeben hatte, erhielt sie viele Nachrichten auf Instagram, in denen sie um Ratschläge gebeten wurde.


“Ich habe ihnen alles erzählt, was ich [in der Genesung] getan habe und was mir tatsächlich geholfen hat”, sagte Georgia. “Und ein paar Monate später schrieben sie mir, dass sie erfolgreich waren. Das war einfach so erfüllend.”

 

So stellte sie beispielsweise fest, dass die Nahrungsaufnahme vor, während und nach dem Training das Wichtigste ist – nicht nur für die RED-S-Erholung, sondern auch für die Zeit danach. In ihren Anfangsjahren als Radprofi fuhr sie unzählige dreistündige Radtouren, ohne einen Snack zu sich zu nehmen. Aber ihre Erholung von RED-S hat ihr gezeigt, wie wichtig es ist, sich zum richtigen Zeitpunkt zu verpflegen.


“Ich wusste nicht, dass ich während einer dreistündigen Radtour etwas essen muss. Und ich hatte nicht wirklich Hunger, weil sich mein Körper einfach daran gewöhnt hat”, sagte Georgia.


Bei der Erholung von RED-S geht es vor allem darum, die Belastung für den Körper zu begrenzen. Deshalb widmete Georgia auch den Großteil ihrer Freizeit der Entspannung – mit vielen Ruhetagen zwischen den lockern Radfahrten. Solange das Training ihren Körper nicht in den “Stressmodus” versetzt, ist es in Ordnung, sie in den Trainingsplan während der Erholung von RED-S zu integrieren.


“Ich ging immer noch auf ein- oder eineinhalbstündige Touren, aber nur mit geringer Intensität, und ich achtete darauf, dass ich während der Fahrt etwas zu essen hatte”, sagte Georgia.


Katie Schofield, eine ehemalige Profiradfahrerin, verfolgte eine ähnliche Strategie. Damals, im Jahr 2014, steckte die Forschung über RED-S und mögliche Behandlungsmethoden noch in den Anfängen, also experimentierte Katie viel mit sich selbst.


“Ich hatte die Möglichkeit, so zu trainieren, wie ich es für nötig hielt, also habe ich es sehr spezifisch gemacht”, sagte Katie. Sie absolvierte drei Wochen lang intensiveres Training und machte dann eine Woche Pause. Außerdem passte sie ihr Training an ihren Menstruationszyklus an, indem sie die Intensität und den Umfang um den Eisprung herum steigerte.


Josh Kozeljs Genesung von RED-S konzentrierte sich hauptsächlich auf seine Ernährung, aber auch darauf, seine Einstellung zum Essen zu ändern. Er erlaubte sich, Lebensmittel zu essen, die er zuvor aus seinem Speiseplan gestrichen hatte, und brachte sich selbst bei, dass es in Ordnung ist, zwischen Frühstück und Mittagessen einen Snack zu essen.


“Es ging darum, bestimmte Dinge hinzuzufügen, die ich vorher weggelassen hatte”, sagte Josh. Er begann auch, direkt nach dem Training einen Snack zu sich zu nehmen oder am späten Abend einen Snack nach dem Abendessen.


Es dauerte etwa ein Jahr, bis es ihm besser ging und er gegen Ende 2019 zu einem normalen Schlafrhythmus zurückkehrte. Auch seine Motivation kehrte zurück, und kurz vor COVID-19 hatte er das Gefühl, “wieder voll dabei zu sein.”


Laut Alicia ist ein Konzept namens “RAVES” ein guter Weg, um sich von Essstörungen zu erholen, denn es dient als Leitfaden, um Athleten zu helfen, sich von RED-S und Unterernährung zu erholen.


“RAVES beginnt mit Regelmäßigkeit, Sättigung und geht dann über zu Abwechslung, sozialem Essen und Spontaneität”, so Alicia.

 

Sportler, die sich von einer Essstörung erholen, beginnen damit, ihre Essgewohnheiten auf Regelmäßigkeit umzustellen. Der nächste Schritt wäre dann die Sättigung, dann die Abwechslung – abwärts entlang des RAVES-Akronyms (auf Englisch).


“Aber wenn wir sehen, dass eine Essstörung beginnt, dann geht es vom S nach oben”, sagt Alicia. “Jemand verliert also vielleicht ein wenig die Spontaneität beim Essen und hört dann vielleicht auf, in der Gesellschaft zu essen.


RAVES ist zwar ein großartiges Instrument, aber die Genesung von RED-S sieht bei jedem Menschen anders aus. Das liegt daran, dass RED-S nicht immer beabsichtigt ist. Bei manchen Sportlern ist es auch situationsbedingt oder zufällig, einfach weil sie nicht genug Geld für Lebensmittel haben oder nicht wissen, wie sie sich richtig ernähren sollen.


“Wenn der Grund dafür solche Dinge sind, dann besteht unser Ziel darin, die Möglichkeit zu verbessern, sich zu ernähren und das Wissen und die Fähigkeiten zu verbessern, wie man mit einem geringen Budget einkaufen kann oder wie man mehr energiereiche Lebensmittel in und um das Training herum zu sich nehmen kann”, sagte Alicia.


Sportler, die sich pflanzlich ernähren, haben auch ein erhöhtes Risiko, an RED-S zu erkranken, da pflanzliche Lebensmittel im Allgemeinen weniger Kalorien enthalten.


Es geht also oft darum, weniger “clean” zu essen, denn “clean” zu essen kann definitiv dazu führen, dass man versehentlich in eine niedrige Energieverfügbarkeit gerät”, sagte Alicia.

 

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at 6 years old. That’s where my love for the sport was sparked, but it would take another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Alicia

Alicia Edge is the cofounder of Compeat Nutrition. She works as a sports nutritionist, where she talks to a lot of athletes who developed RED-S. She also shares her knowledge in her podcast “The Compeat Waffle.”

Meet Josh

Josh Kozelj is a Canadian journalist and runner. During his undergraduate studies, he competed in cross-country and track and field for the University of Victoria in Canada, where he developed RED-S in his second year. He is now pursuing a master’s degree in journalism. 

Meet Georgia

Georgia Williams is a professional road cyclist from New Zealand. Her biggest achievement in cycling is a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2018. After that, she decided to dedicate a few months to her recovery from RED-S. Now, she is hoping to compete at the women’s Tour de France this summer. 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

The Lesser Known Symptoms of RED-S

Edit
Click here to add content.

The Lesser Known Symptoms of RED-S

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

This is the fourth part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

Josh kept losing weight – until the personal bests stopped coming. Instead, his performance was plateauing. And that’s when not only his teammates, but also his coaches started to be concerned.

 

“My coaches called me in and told me they were worried about how skinny I look,” Josh said. “Hearing it from the coaches and my teammates really opened my eyes.”

 

Josh never saw a doctor about his health problems, because he always thought that there was nothing wrong with him until his coaches pointed out how skinny he was. They referred him to professionals who could help and had a nutritionist coming in to talk to the whole cross-country team.

 

While Josh was never diagnosed with an eating disorder, not fueling his body enough for the activities he was doing drained his passion for the sport he loved. But luckily, he was spared from any serious injuries as a result of RED-S.

 

“I’ve been really lucky that a lot of my injuries have not been related to running,” Josh said.

 

However, he experienced some of the most common symptoms of RED-S: sleep problems.

“If you’re in low energy availability, you won’t sleep very well because you are waking up because your body is telling you that you’re hungry. So that will disturb your sleep,” said Dr Nicky Keay. “But then if your sleep is disturbed, that disrupts your hormones because sleep is sort of a timekeeper for your hormones.” 

In this vicious cycle, it is hard to tell which was first: disturbed hormones or disturbed sleep patterns. “It goes around and around and around and gets unfortunately worse,” said Nicky.

 

A disrupted hormonal system – that’s also something that Josh experienced.

 

“I never got a specific diagnosis, but I kind of had low testosterone, which maybe affected my sleep cycle,” said Josh.

 

While RED-S affects the hormonal system in both men and women, it does so in different ways. In women, it’s more obvious, because low estrogen levels result in amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea. Men, on the other hand, experience low testosterone levels.

 

To find out how RED-S affects athletes’ hormonal systems, I talked to Alicia Edge, a sports nutritionist from Australia.

 

“If we don’t have enough energy to cover the cost of training, our body still finds the energy for it, because most athletes decide to keep training,” Alicia said.

 

That means: The body has to cover the cost of training, but then there’s less energy left over for the rest of the body processes.

“Our body starts going into budget mode, and it needs to find ways to conserve energy,” Alicia said. “[Systems] that are considered non-essential, particularly reproductive health but also gut function can be some of the first that are dimmed down.” 

For female athletes, this can mean a pause of the menstrual cycle (secondary amenorrhea), a lengthening of the menstrual cycle (oligomenorrhea), or a delayed onset of menstruation (primary amenorrhea).

 

For male athletes, it’s not that obvious. Men who have RED-S often experience reduced libido, low sex drive and less morning erections. It’s uncomfortable to talk about that, which is another reason why RED-S often remains undetected in men.

 

Alicia is currently working on a screening tool for RED-S in male athletes, which will be published in April this year.

 

“So that’s going to change the game, I think, in terms of us being able to better screen for energy deficiency in men,” Alicia said.

 

But hormonal issues are not the only RED-S symptom where there’s a difference between men and women. It seems as though women are more affected by gut issues than men, even though there are no particular studies on digestive problems and RED-S.

 

“[That could be] related to the female hormones that are involved in gut health,” said Nicky. These hormones can be affected by RED-S, which could lead to a higher tendency to gut issues in women. However, this is just an observation Nicky has made in her clinical trials with male and female athletes.

 

In my conversations with Josh, Katie, and Georgia, there was another symptom that came up a few times: iron deficiency.

 

“My main symptoms were fatigue and being emotionally quite low, having no ‘get up and go’. I would also have bowel issues, iron deficiency, and no menstrual cycle,” Katie said when I asked her about her RED-S symptoms.

 

Josh told me something similar: “I became really iron deficient, and I couldn’t even get off the couch at all. I was just lacking the same drive that I had.”

 

However, it’s still unclear if and how iron deficiency and RED-S are related. But there are theories.

“The obvious way of looking at it would be to say ‘Oh well, if you’re not eating a lot, then maybe you’re restricting food groups, maybe you’re not eating red meat or foods with iron in them, maybe it’s simply not enough of those things,’” said Nicky. 

Nutrition is one thing, but overtraining can be the other. And a heavy training load can impact iron stores – especially in women.

 

“The iron deficiency element is probably a very high training load not matched with nutrition but also recovery,” said Nicky.

 

When the body is under high stress that’s not compensated with enough recovery, it is going to lose iron as muscles can’t repair the micro damage that happens as a result of training. This is especially the case in impact sports – like running.

Die weniger bekannten Symptome von RED-S

Josh nahm weiter ab – bis die persönlichen Bestzeiten ausblieben. Stattdessen stagnierte seine Leistung. Und das war der Zeitpunkt, an dem nicht nur seine Teamkollegen, sondern auch seine Trainer begannen, sich Sorgen zu machen.

 

“Meine Trainer riefen mich an und sagten mir, dass sie sich Sorgen darüber machen, wie dünn ich aussehe”, sagte Josh. “Es von den Trainern und meinen Teamkollegen zu hören, hat mir wirklich die Augen geöffnet.”

 

Josh war wegen seiner gesundheitlichen Probleme nie zum Arzt gegangen, weil er immer dachte, dass mit ihm alles in Ordnung sei. Bis seine Trainer ihn darauf hinwiesen, wie dünn er war. Sie verwiesen ihn an Fachleute, die ihm helfen konnten, und ließen einen Ernährungsberater kommen, der mit dem gesamten Cross-Country-Team sprach.

 

Bei Josh wurde zwar nie eine Essstörung diagnostiziert, aber die unzureichende Verpflegung mit Energie, nahm ihm die Leidenschaft für den Sport, den er liebte. Aber zum Glück blieb er von ernsthaften Verletzungen infolge von RED-S verschont.

 

“Ich hatte wirklich Glück, dass viele meiner Verletzungen nicht mit dem Laufen zusammenhingen”, sagt Josh.

 

Allerdings litt er unter einigen der häufigsten Symptome von RED-S: Schlafprobleme.

 

“Wenn du wenig Energie zur Verfügung hast, schläfst du nicht sehr gut, weil du aufwachst und dein Körper dir sagt, dass du hungrig bist. Das stört dann den Schlaf”, sagt Dr. Nicky Keay. “Wenn dein Schlaf gestört ist, stört das wiederum deine Hormone, denn der Schlaf ist eine Art Zeitmesser für den Hormonhaushalt.”

 

In diesem Teufelskreis ist es schwer zu sagen, was zuerst da war: gestörte Hormone oder gestörte Schlafmuster. “Es geht immer weiter und weiter und wird leider immer schlimmer”, sagt Nicky.

 

Ein gestörtes Hormonsystem – das ist auch etwas, das Josh erlebt hat.

 

“Ich habe nie eine genaue Diagnose bekommen, aber ich hatte eine Art niedrigen Testosteronspiegel, der vielleicht meinen Schlafzyklus beeinflusst hat”, sagt Josh.

 

RED-S wirkt sich zwar sowohl bei Männern als auch bei Frauen auf den Hormonhaushalt aus, aber auf unterschiedliche Weise. Bei Frauen ist es offensichtlicher, denn ein niedriger Östrogenspiegel führt zu Amenorrhö oder Oligomenorrhö. Männer hingegen leiden unter einem niedrigen Testosteronspiegel.

 

Um herauszufinden, wie sich RED-S auf das Hormonsystem von Sportlern auswirkt, habe ich mit Alicia Edge, einer Sporternährungsberaterin aus Australien, gesprochen.

 

“Wenn wir nicht genug Energie haben, um die Energieausgaben für das Training zu decken, findet unser Körper trotzdem die Energie dafür, denn die meisten Sportler trainieren einfach weiter”, so Alicia.

 

Das bedeutet: Der Körper muss die Energie für das Training decken, aber dann bleibt weniger Energie für die übrigen Körperprozesse übrig.

 

“Unser Körper schaltet auf Sparflamme und muss Wege finden, um Energie zu sparen”, sagt Alicia. “Systeme, die als nicht lebensnotwendig gelten, insbesondere die reproduktive Gesundheit, aber auch die Darmfunktion, können zu den ersten gehören, die heruntergefahren werden.

 

Bei Sportlerinnen kann dies eine Unterbrechung des Menstruationszyklus (sekundäre Amenorrhoe), eine Verlängerung des Menstruationszyklus (Oligomenorrhoe) oder ein verzögertes Einsetzen der Menstruation (primäre Amenorrhoe) bedeuten.

 

Bei männlichen Sportlern ist oft es nicht so offensichtlich. Männer, die an RED-S leiden, erleben oft eine verminderte Libido, einen geringen Sexualtrieb und weniger morgendliche Erektionen. Es ist unangenehm, darüber zu sprechen, was ein weiterer Grund dafür ist, dass RED-S bei Männern oft unerkannt bleibt.

 

Alicia arbeitet derzeit an einem Screening-Tool für RED-S bei männlichen Sportlern, das dieses Jahres veröffentlicht werden soll.

 

“Ich denke, das wird das Spiel verändern, da wir in der Lage sein werden, Energiemangel bei Männern besser zu erkennen”, sagte Alicia.

 

Hormonelle Probleme sind jedoch nicht das einzige RED-S-Symptom, bei dem es einen Unterschied zwischen Männern und Frauen gibt. Es scheint, als wären Frauen stärker von Darmproblemen betroffen als Männer, auch wenn es keine speziellen Studien über Verdauungsprobleme und RED-S gibt.

 

“Das könnte mit den weiblichen Hormonen zusammenhängen, die an der Darmgesundheit beteiligt sind”, sagt Nicky. Diese Hormone können durch RED-S beeinflusst werden, was bei Frauen zu einer höheren Neigung zu Darmproblemen führen könnte. Dies ist jedoch nur eine Beobachtung, die Nicky in ihren klinischen Studien mit männlichen und weiblichen Sportlern gemacht hat.

 

In meinen Gesprächen mit Josh, Katie und Georgia kam ein weiteres Symptom immer wieder zur Sprache: Eisenmangel.

 

“Meine Hauptsymptome waren Müdigkeit und emotionale Niedergeschlagenheit, ich konnte mich nicht aufraffen. Außerdem hatte ich Darmprobleme, Eisenmangel und keinen Menstruationszyklus”, sagte Katie, als ich sie nach ihren RED-S-Symptomen fragte.

 

Josh erzählte mir etwas Ähnliches: “Ich hatte einen echten Eisenmangel und konnte mich nicht einmal mehr von der Couch erheben. Mir fehlte einfach derselbe Antrieb, den ich früher hatte.”

 

Es ist jedoch immer noch unklar, ob und wie Eisenmangel und RED-S zusammenhängen. Aber es gibt Theorien.

 

“Die naheliegendste Betrachtungsweise wäre: ‘Na ja, wenn du nicht viel isst, dann schränkst du vielleicht Lebensmittelgruppen ein, vielleicht isst du kein rotes Fleisch oder keine eisenhaltigen Lebensmittel, vielleicht ist es einfach zu wenig von diesen Dingen'”, sagt Nicky.

 

Die Ernährung ist das eine, Übertraining kann das andere sein. Und eine hohe Trainingsbelastung kann sich auf die Eisenspeicher auswirken – vor allem bei Frauen.

 

“Das Element des Eisenmangels ist wahrscheinlich eine sehr hohe Trainingsbelastung, die nicht mit der Ernährung, aber auch nicht mit der Erholung in Einklang gebracht wird”, so Nicky.

 

Wenn der Körper einer hohen Belastung ausgesetzt ist, die nicht durch ausreichende Erholung kompensiert wird, verliert er Eisen, da die Muskeln die Mikroschäden, die durch das Training entstehen, nicht reparieren können. Dies ist vor allem bei Sportarten mit hoher Stoßbelastung – wie dem Laufen – der Fall.

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Alicia

Alicia Edge is the cofounder of Compeat Nutrition. She works as a sports nutritionist, where she talks to a lot of athletes who developed RED-S. She also shares her knowledge in her podcast “The Compeat Waffle.”

Meet Georgia

Georgia Williams is a professional road cyclist from New Zealand. Her biggest achievement in cycling is a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2018. After that, she decided to dedicate a few months to her recovery from RED-S. Now, she is hoping to compete at the women’s Tour de France this summer. 

Meet Josh

Josh Kozelj is a Canadian journalist and runner. During his undergraduate studies, he competed in cross-country and track and field for the University of Victoria in Canada, where he developed RED-S in his second year. He is now pursuing a master’s degree in journalism. 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

The Fight Against Food: RED-S and Disordered Eating

Edit
Click here to add content.

The Fight Against Food: RED-S and Disordered Eating

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

This is the third part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

Growing up, Josh Kozelj was always self-conscious about weight, even though he had never been “big”.

 

“I would always be double-checking,” Josh said about his food choices. “Should I have these two granola bars before going to bed? I’m so hungry.”

 

Always on the back of his mind, his self-consciousness around weight would later turn into an obsession.

 

“I would wake up, have breakfast and force myself to not eat until lunchtime at noon,” Josh said. Even when his stomach was growling, he didn’t allow himself to have lunch before 12 p.m. He started losing weight until the scale went down to 133 pounds.

“When I was at 133 pounds, I would step off the scale, go to the locker room, eat an apple and think of how many calories that apple has. How much weight am I going to gain?” Josh said. “It really messes with your head.” 

Josh’s relationship with food started getting worse while he was running for the University of Victoria in Canada. In 2018, his second year at university, Josh finished the season with personal bests in the 5K and the 10K, ready to start the upcoming season in shape. “That summer, I thought that the best way I could get into shape was by restricting my diet,” he said.

 

He maintained a low weight throughout the summer – but didn’t realize how skinny he was until teammates started pointing it out to him.

 

“They said, ‘wow, you’re looking pretty light’, and I just assumed that they thought I was in good shape,” Josh said.

 

That’s where the narrative of lighter means faster comes in. In running, next to other endurance sports or aesthetic sports, athletes who are unusually light serve as role models.

“It is almost like we celebrate these athletes who are very skinny,” Josh said. He recounts scrolling on Instagram, wishing to look like the runners on there. “All these runners looked pretty similar and you think to yourself, ‘why can’t I look like this.’”

This is what Barbara Drinkwater and her colleagues were talking about when they published the first commentary on the female athlete triad in 1992: “A pressure to excel was common among affected athletes as well as constant attention given to achieving or maintaining an ‘ideal’ body weight.”

 

However, this pressure to succeed doesn’t only affect women and the resulting health problems, even more so, don’t only affect women.

 

Fueled by the belief that losing weight makes you run faster, Josh developed bad eating habits. As a result, he experienced a lot of fatigue – both mentally and physically.

 

“I was lacking the motivation to do a lot of things that I saw as enjoyable before,” Josh said.

 

It came to a point where he didn’t even want to go for runs anymore because he was too fatigued. “If I wanted to go for a 30 to 50 minute run, I would just constantly dread it,” Josh said.

 

Running is not the only sport where weight takes influence on performance.

 

Dr Nicky Keay, expert on RED-S and LEA, said that athletes in aesthetic and anti-gravitational sports are at a higher risk of developing RED-S.

“Going up a very steep mountain on a road bike, physics tells you that being lighter is going to have a certain advantage,” Nicky said. “But especially if sports are anti-gravitational and focus on endurance, body weight presents a potential performance advantage.” 

Katie Schofield, a former New Zealand track cyclist, said that the culture in track cycling is very focused on being as lean and strong as possible. As a perfectionist and due to her background in sports nutrition, Katie often stood in her own way when it came to fueling.

 

“It’s kind of your worst enemy, because I knew how to walk that fine balance. I knew how to manipulate food,” she said.

 

While she never developed a full-blown eating disorder, she said she probably had disordered eating. And another factor that pushed her underfueling were her gut issues. “I removed gluten from my diet and replaced that with other foods. But I think the volume was just lacking.”

 

At the peak of her career, Katie was training between 20 and 25 hours a week. And she wasn’t matching the amount of exercise with the right amount of fuel.

 

“With high intensity sessions, you lose your appetite. That’s what I struggled with the most,” she said.

 

When the appetite comes back four or five hours later, it’s already too late to fuel up.

 

Georgia Williams, New Zealand road cyclist, has a similar story to tell. The professional cycling world puts so much emphasis on being lean that it’s almost impossible to avoid adopting the mindset of being skinny makes you faster.

“It always just comes up, the topic of how skinny such and such person is,” Georgia said. “That’s always in the back of your mind.”

Just like Josh and Katie, Georgia was never diagnosed with an eating disorder, but she did try to lose weight deliberately.

 

“I’d still eat quite a bit, but it’s just all super healthy and, obviously, really low calorie,” she said.

 

But sometimes, “super healthy” doesn’t actually mean “super healthy”.

 

And sometimes, gaining weight is a positive thing – even though it goes against everything athletes are told to improve performance.

Post Tags

Essstörungen im Sport: Wenn "gesund" nicht wirklich "gesund" bedeutet

Als Kind war Josh Kozelj wegen seines Gewichts immer unsicher, obwohl er nie “dick” war.

 

“Ich habe immer alles doppelt überprüft”, sagt Josh über seine Ernährung. “Soll ich diese zwei Müsliriegel essen, bevor ich ins Bett gehe? Ich habe so einen Hunger.”

 

Sein schlechtes Gefühl in Bezug auf sein Gewicht, das er immer im Hinterkopf hatte, wurde später zu einer Obsession.

 

“Ich wachte auf, frühstückte und zwang mich, bis zum Mittag nichts zu essen”, sagt Josh. Selbst wenn sein Magen knurrte, erlaubte er sich nicht, vor 12 Uhr etwas zu essen. Er begann abzunehmen, bis die Waage auf 133 Pfund sank.

 

“Als ich 133 Pfund wog, stieg ich von der Waage, ging in die Umkleidekabine, aß einen Apfel und überlegte, wie viele Kalorien dieser Apfel hat. Wie viel werde ich wohl zunehmen?” sagte Josh. “Das bringt deinen Kopf wirklich durcheinander.

 

Joshs Beziehung zum Essen begann sich zu verschlechtern, als er für die University of Victoria in Kanada lief. Im Jahr 2018, seinem zweiten Jahr an der Universität, beendete Josh die Saison mit persönlichen Bestzeiten auf 5 km und 10 km und war bereit, die kommende Saison in guter Form zu beginnen. “In diesem Sommer dachte ich, dass ich am besten in Form komme, wenn ich meine Ernährung einschränke”, sagt er.

 

Den ganzen Sommer über hielt er sein Gewicht niedrig – aber er merkte nicht, wie dünn er war, bis ihn seine Teamkollegen darauf hinwiesen.

 

“Sie sagten: ‘Wow, du siehst ziemlich schlank aus’, und ich nahm einfach an, dass sie dachten, ich sei in guter Form”, sagte Josh.

 

Das ist der Punkt, an dem die Aussage “leichter bedeutet schneller” ins Spiel kommt. Neben anderen Ausdauersportarten oder ästhetischen Sportarten dienen Athleten, die ungewöhnlich leicht sind, im Laufsport als Vorbilder.

 

“Es ist fast so, als würden wir diese Sportler feiern, die sehr dünn sind”, sagt Josh. Er erzählt, wie er auf Instagram scrollte und sich wünschte, so auszusehen wie die Läufer dort. “All diese Läufer sahen ziemlich ähnlich aus und man denkt sich: ‘Warum kann ich nicht so aussehen?'”

 

Davon sprachen auch Barbara Drinkwater und ihre Kollegen, als sie 1992 den ersten Kommentar über die weibliche Athleten-Trias veröffentlichten: “Ein Leistungsdruck war unter den betroffenen Athleten ebenso verbreitet wie die ständige Aufmerksamkeit, ein ‘ideales’ Körpergewicht zu erreichen oder zu halten.”

 

Dieser Erfolgsdruck betrifft jedoch nicht nur Frauen, und die daraus resultierenden gesundheitlichen Probleme betreffen erst recht nicht nur Frauen.

 

Angetrieben von dem Glauben, dass man durch Abnehmen schneller laufen kann, entwickelte Josh schlechte Essgewohnheiten. Infolgedessen litt er unter großer Müdigkeit – sowohl geistig als auch körperlich.

 

“Mir fehlte die Motivation, viele Dinge zu tun, die ich früher mochte”, sagte Josh.

 

Es kam zu einem Punkt, an dem er nicht einmal mehr laufen gehen wollte, weil er zu erschöpft war. “Wenn ich einen 30- bis 50-minütigen Lauf machen wollte, hatte ich Angst davor”, sagte Josh.

 

Laufen ist nicht die einzige Sportart, bei der sich das Gewicht auf die Leistung auswirkt.

 

Dr. Nicky Keay, Experte für RED-S und LEA, sagte, dass Athleten in ästhetischen und Antigravitations-Sportarten ein höheres Risiko haben, RED-S zu entwickeln.

 

“Wenn man auf einem Rennrad einen sehr steilen Berg hinauffährt, sagt einem die Physik, dass ein geringeres Gewicht einen gewissen Vorteil bringt”, so Nicky. “Aber vor allem bei Sportarten, die gegen die Schwerkraft gerichtet sind und sich auf die Ausdauer konzentrieren, stellt das Körpergewicht einen potenziellen Leistungsvorteil dar.”

 

Katie Schofield, eine ehemalige neuseeländische Bahnradfahrerin, sagte, dass die Kultur im Bahnradsport sehr darauf ausgerichtet ist, so schlank und stark wie möglich zu sein. Als Perfektionistin und aufgrund ihres Hintergrunds im Bereich Sporternährung stand Katie sich oft selbst im Weg, wenn es um ihre Ernährung ging.

 

“Das ist sozusagen dein schlimmster Feind, denn ich wusste, wie man diesen Spagat hinbekommt. Ich wusste, wie man Lebensmittel manipuliert”, sagte sie.

 

Obwohl sie nie eine ausgewachsene Essstörung entwickelte, sagte sie, dass ihr Essverhalten wahrscheinlich leicht gestört war. Und ein weiterer Faktor, der sie dazu brachte, sich zu wenig zu ernähren, waren ihre Darmbeschwerden. “Ich habe Gluten aus meiner Ernährung gestrichen und durch andere Lebensmittel ersetzt. Aber ich glaube, die Menge war einfach zu gering.”

 

Auf dem Höhepunkt ihrer Karriere trainierte Katie zwischen 20 und 25 Stunden pro Woche. Dabei passte aber die Menge an Training nicht mit der richtigen Menge an Nährstoffen zusammen.

 

“Bei hochintensiven Trainingseinheiten verliert man den Appetit. Damit hatte ich am meisten zu kämpfen”, sagt sie.

 

Wenn der Appetit vier oder fünf Stunden später wiederkommt, ist es bereits zu spät, um nachzutanken.

 

Georgia Williams, eine neuseeländische Rennradfahrerin, hat eine ähnliche Geschichte zu erzählen. In der Welt des Profiradsports wird so viel Wert darauf gelegt, schlank zu sein, dass es fast unmöglich ist, sich der Denkweise zu entziehen, dass man schneller ist, wenn man dünn ist.

 

“Es kommt immer wieder zur Sprache, wie dünn diese und jene Person ist”, sagte Georgia. “Das hat man immer im Hinterkopf.”

 

Genau wie bei Josh und Katie wurde bei Georgia nie eine ausgewachsene Essstörung diagnostiziert, aber sie hat versucht, absichtlich abzunehmen.

 

“Ich aß immer noch ziemlich viel, aber es ist alles super gesund und natürlich sehr kalorienarm”, sagt sie.

 

Aber manchmal bedeutet “supergesund” nicht wirklich “supergesund”. Und manchmal ist eine Gewichtszunahme sogar positiv.

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Josh

Josh Kozelj is a Canadian journalist and runner. During his undergraduate studies, he competed in cross-country and track and field for the University of Victoria in Canada, where he developed RED-S in his second year. He is now pursuing a master’s degree in journalism. 

Meet Georgia

Georgia Williams is a professional road cyclist from New Zealand. Her biggest achievement in cycling is a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2018. After that, she decided to dedicate a few months to her recovery from RED-S. Now, she is hoping to compete at the women’s Tour de France this summer. 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

Fractured Bones: When Undereating Makes Bones Brittle

Edit
Click here to add content.

Fractured Bones: When Undereating Makes Bones Brittle

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

This is the second part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

Shortly before the Giro d’Italia 2019 – the most important women’s cycling race – New Zealand road cyclist Georgia Williams crashed on a training ride.

 

“I just slipped on a corner and ended up fracturing my hip, my pelvis, and my sacrum,” she said. “Normally, if someone slips like that, they would be fine. But yeah, I guess that was my wake-up call. I shouldn’t have broken these three bones.”

 

Not only did she have to recover from three broken bones, but also from five or six years of amenorrhea and undereating. Not an easy task – but at least she had her team’s and her coaches’ support.

 

“They sort of said, take all the time off that you need,” Georgia said. “It’s crazy for teams to do that and obviously still pay you.”

 

But warning signs for RED-S came long before her crash in 2019. The first one was prior to the Commonwealth Games in 2018, when she saw a doctor for pre-race medical tests, and she was asked when she had had her last menstrual cycle.

 

“And I said I haven’t had one in three or four years.”

She didn’t expect her answer to be an issue because her previous visits to the gynecologist had concluded that a missing menstrual cycle was normal for female athletes. Then she was put on birth control. But this time, the doctor insisted on bringing her cycle back naturally – without the help of the pill. They also wanted her to get a bone density scan.

“I was like okay, I didn’t know that bone density and your menstrual cycle were related,” Georgia said. But she was even more surprised about the results of the scan. “[The doctor said], ‘your bones are like those of an 80-year-old woman.’” 

Her lower spine was in the osteoporosis zone, while her hips were in osteopenia – the stage that comes before osteoporosis.

 

“That was pretty scary to hear,” Georgia said. Her doctor recommended to up her fuel intake to get her period back. “Obviously you’re worried about weight gain and that was really hard for me to do, and I didn’t really listen to him.”

 

Then, six months later, she crashed and fractured three bones. And that’s when she realized that she needed to put her health first. But is it possible to fully reverse the damage?

 

Dr Nicky Keay, who has been researching RED-S for more than 30 years, gets asked this question a lot. And to her, the answer is clear: “Yeah, they can.”

 

But only, if the athletes take recovery seriously. The keys to a successful recovery are those: appropriate fueling before, during and after training, as well as weight-bearing exercise.

 

“Cycling is not building your bones,” Nicky said. “But if they do those two things, then yes, you can improve your bone density.”

 

Georgia’s colleague, Katie Schofield, who is also a New Zealand track cyclist, experienced amenorrhea and fatigue as a result of undereating, but her bone mineral density wasn’t impacted. She attributes that to her background in track and field.

“I was fortunate that my bone density was normal,” Katie said. “Having track and field as the background was building all that bone density with the impact [from running].” 

As a track cycling sprinter, she would also spend hours on hours in the gym, which helps strengthen the bones. She also didn’t suffer any serious injuries as a professional cyclist. While her chronic knee injury would flare up sometimes, she didn’t have any fractures or other bone injuries.

 

“All the crashes that I have had, I’ve come off okay,” Katie said and explains this with her good bone density.

 

Nonetheless, recovering from RED-S wasn’t easy.

 

After Katie was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, she decided to leave the New Zealand cycling program to give her body time to heal. For three months, she barely touched her bike and actually gave herself some downtime.

 

“My main goal was to get my menstrual cycle back,” she said. So she continued to fuel up and increase her body weight. When she got back into training, she gradually increased intensity and slowly added more training sessions.

 

“I looked at it from that point of what I need to get my health back because if my health is not optimal, my training’s not going to be optimal. My biggest goal was to get back to competing at a high level,” Katie said. She could only continue where she left off the previous year if she was healthy.

 

After she embarked on her RED-S recovery journey, it took her eight months to get her period back. It took another ten or so months for her cycle to become stable.

“I’d lost my cycle for a good two years before that,” Katie said. For her, making the switch to integrating more carbs in her diet was the key to recovery. “I wasn’t really changing what I was eating, but the quantity.”

Instead of using estrogen medication like estrogen patches, she took the natural approach to recovery and lowered training volume and stress while increasing her nutrition intake.

 

“I don’t think if I was diagnosed with RED-S and stayed within the program, I would have bounced back as quickly,” Katie said, reflecting on her decision to focus on her health.

 

She returned to training in the same year she was diagnosed with RED-S: 2014, the year the International Olympic Committee published a statement that recognized RED-S as a syndrome that affects both men and women.

 

But what are the differences between the two sexes when it comes to RED-S?

RED-S: Der Zusammenhang von Ernährung und Stressfrakturen

Kurz vor der Giro d’Italia 2019 – dem wichtigsten Radrennen im Frauen-Radsport – stürzte die Georgia Williams bei einer Trainingsfahrt.

 

“Ich bin einfach in einer Kurve ausgerutscht und habe mir dabei die Hüfte, das Becken und das Kreuzbein gebrochen”, sagt die Profi-Radfahrerin aus Neuseeland. “Normalerweise geht es jemandem, der so ausrutscht, gut. Aber ja, ich denke, das war mein Weckruf. Ich hätte mir diese drei Knochen nicht brechen dürfen.”

 

Danach musste sie sich nicht nur von drei Frakturen erholen, sondern auch von fünf oder sechs Jahren Amenorrhö und Unterernährung. Keine leichte Aufgabe – aber wenigstens hatte sie die Unterstützung ihres Teams und ihrer Trainer.

 

“Sie sagten quasi, nimm dir so viel Zeit, wie du brauchst”, sagt Georgia. “Es ist verrückt, dass manche Teams das tun und dich natürlich trotzdem bezahlen.

 

Warnzeichen für RED-S gab es jedoch schon lange vor ihrem Sturz im Jahr 2019. Das erste kam vor den Commonwealth Games in 2018, als sie vor dem Rennen eine Sportuntersuchung machen musste und sie gefragt wurde, wann sie ihre letzte Periode hatte.

 

“Und ich sagte, dass ich seit drei oder vier Jahren keine mehr hatte.”

 

Georgia hatte nicht erwartet, dass ihre Antwort ein Problem darstellen würde, da ihre früheren Besuche beim Gynäkologen zu dem Schluss gekommen waren, dass ein fehlender Menstruationszyklus für Sportlerinnen normal sei. Und dann wurde ihr die Pille verschrieben.

 

Doch dieses Mal bestand der Arzt darauf, ihren Zyklus auf natürliche Weise zurückzubringen – ohne Hilfe der Pille. Außerdem musste sie eine Knochendichtemessung machen lassen.

 

“Ich wusste nicht, dass Knochendichte und Menstruationszyklus zusammenhängen”, sagt Georgia. Noch überraschter war sie jedoch über die Ergebnisse der Knochendichte-Untersuchung. “[Der Arzt sagte], ‘Ihre Knochen sind wie die einer 80-jährigen Frau.'”

 

Ihre untere Wirbelsäule befand sich im Bereich der Osteoporose, während ihre Hüften im Stadium der Osteopenie waren – dem Vorstadium der Osteoporose.

 

“Das war ziemlich beängstigend zu hören”, sagt Georgia. Ihr Arzt empfahl ihr, mehr Nahrung zu sich zu nehmen, um ihre Periode wiederzubekommen. “Natürlich macht man sich Sorgen wegen der Gewichtszunahme, und das fiel mir wirklich schwer, deshalb ich habe nicht wirklich auf ihn gehört.”

 

Sechs Monate später stürzte sie und brach sich drei Knochen. Und in diesem Moment wurde ihr klar, dass sie ihre Gesundheit an die erste Stelle setzen musste. Aber ist es möglich, die Knochendichte wieder in einen gesunden Zustand zu bringen?

 

Dr. Nicky Keay, die seit mehr als 30 Jahren über RED-S forscht, wird diese Frage oft gestellt. Und für sie ist die Antwort klar: “Ja, das kann man.”

 

Aber nur, wenn die Sportler die Genesung von RED-S ernst nehmen. Die Schlüssel für eine erfolgreiche Erholung sind: eine angemessene Versorgung mit Nahrung vor, während und nach dem Training sowie gewichtsbelastende Aktivitäten.

 

“Radfahren baut die Knochendichte nicht auf”, sagt Nicky. “Aber wenn Sportler diese beiden Dinge tun, dann können Sie Ihre Knochendichte verbessern.”

 

Georgias Kollegin Katie Schofield, ebenfalls eine neuseeländische Radrennfahrerin, litt unter Amenorrhoe und Müdigkeit, weil sie sich für ihren Trainingsaufwand mit zu wenig Essen verpflegte, aber ihre Knochendichte wurde nicht beeinträchtigt. Sie führt dies auf ihren Hintergrund in der Leichtathletik zurück.

 

“Ich hatte das Glück, dass meine Knochendichte normal blieb”, sagt Katie. “Das Sprinten in der Leichtathletik hat mir beim Aufbau der Knochendichte in jüngeren Jahren geholfen.“

 

Als Sprinterin verbrachte sie auch viele Stunden im Fitnessstudio, was zur Stärkung der Knochen beiträgt. Später, als Profi-Radsportlerin, erlitt sie auch keine schweren Verletzungen. Ihre chronische Knieverletzung flammte zwar manchmal auf, aber sie hatte keine Frakturen oder andere Knochenverletzungen.

 

“Alle Stürze, die ich hatte, habe ich gut überstanden”, sagt Katie und erklärt dies mit ihrer guten Knochendichte.

 

Trotzdem war es nicht leicht, sich von RED-S zu erholen.

 

Nachdem bei Katie in 2014 RED-S diagnostiziert wurde, beschloss sie, die neuseeländische Nationalmannschaft zu verlassen, um ihrem Körper Zeit zur Besserung zu geben. Drei Monate lang rührte sie ihr Fahrrad kaum an und gönnte sich eine Auszeit.

 

“Mein Hauptziel war es, meinen Menstruationszyklus wiederzubekommen”, sagt sie. Also tankte sie weiter auf und nahm an Gewicht zu. Als sie wieder mit dem Training begann, steigerte sie allmählich die Intensität und fügte nach und nach weitere Trainingseinheiten hinzu.

 

“Ich tat, was ich brauche, um meine Gesundheit wiederzuerlangen, denn wenn meine Gesundheit nicht optimal ist, kann ich auch nicht optimal trainieren. Mein größtes Ziel war es, wieder an Wettkämpfen auf hohem Niveau teilzunehmen”, sagt Katie. Und sie konnte nur dann dort weitermachen, wo sie im Vorjahr aufgehört hatte, wenn sie gesund war.

 

Nachdem sie begonnen hatte, sich aktiv von RED-S zu erholen, dauerte es acht Monate, bis sie ihre Periode wieder bekam. Es dauerte weitere zehn Monate, bis sich ihr Zyklus stabilisierte.

 

“Davor hatte ich meinen Zyklus für gut zwei Jahre verloren”, sagte Katie. Für sie war die Umstellung auf eine kohlenhydratreichere Ernährung der Schlüssel zur Genesung. “Ich habe nicht wirklich geändert, was ich esse, sondern die Menge.

 

Statt Medikamente wie Östrogenpflaster zu verwenden, wählte sie einen natürlichen Ansatz zur Erholung und reduzierte Trainingsumfang und Stress, während sie ihre Nahrungsaufnahme erhöhte.

 

“Ich glaube nicht, dass ich mich so schnell erholt hätte, wenn bei mir RED-S diagnostiziert worden wäre und ich nicht aus der Nationalmannschaft ausgetreten wäre”, sagt Katie, wenn sie über ihre Entscheidung nachdenkt, sich auf ihre Gesundheit zu konzentrieren.

 

Dennoch begann sie im selben Jahr, in dem bei ihr RED-S diagnostiziert wurde, wieder mit dem Training: 2014, das Jahr, in dem das Internationale Olympische Komitee das Statement veröffentlichte, in dem RED-S als ein Syndrom anerkannt wurde, das sowohl Männer als auch Frauen betrifft.

 

Aber welche Unterschiede gibt es zwischen Männern und Frauen bei RED-S?

 

Mehr dazu gibt es im nächsten Artikel! 

Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Georgia

Georgia Williams is a professional road cyclist from New Zealand. Her biggest achievement in cycling is a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2018. After that, she decided to dedicate a few months to her recovery from RED-S. Now, she is hoping to compete at the women’s Tour de France this summer. 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

Discovering RED-S: How the Female Athlete Triad Gave Way to RED-S

Edit
Click here to add content.

Discovering RED-S: How the Female Athlete Triad Gave Way to RED-S

This is the first part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

The first modern Olympic Games in 1896 were held without women. Four years later, women were allowed to compete in five sports: tennis, sailing, croquet, golf, and equestrianism. Out of 997 athletes, 22 were female.

 

But this isn’t an article about gender equality in sport. Rather, this is a story about a condition that was discovered because women were allowed to compete in sports: the female athlete triad.

 

“It was first described back in the 1980s by Barbara Drinkwater,” said Dr. Nicky Keay, a sports and dance endocrinologist from the U.K. In her more than 25 years of research, Nicky has had a tremendous influence on the knowledge of the female athlete triad and low energy availability in sport.

 

In 1992, the American College of Sports Medicine invited a group of experts to discuss the issue – and that’s when the term female athlete triad was coined: a triangle of disordered eating, amenorrhea and low bone density.

“Female runners that had a higher mileage and were eating the same as their counterparts doing a lower mileage per week reported more menstrual problems and poor bone health,” said Nicky.

Twenty years before the 1992 conference on the female athlete, Title IX was passed in the United States: a law that protects women from educational discrimination based on sex. After that, female participation in sports activities skyrocketed, along with the number of women reporting menstrual problems.

 

“A frequent symptom of eating disorders in women is amenorrhea. (…) Once menstrual dysfunction develops, bone loss may occur,” reads the commentary on the female athlete triad written by Barbara Drinkwater and others.

 

But despite its name, the female athlete triad doesn’t only affect women.

 

“In women, it’s more obvious because you have the clinical sign of [missing] periods,” said Nicky.

 

Men don’t have periods. But the other two factors of the triad remain the same – disordered eating and low bone density.

 

That’s why 22 years after the female athlete triad was discovered, the term was replaced by a different one: relative energy deficiency in sport. In short, RED-S.

 

The IOC published a statement on RED-S in 2014 that was revolutionary in two ways: First, it said that RED-S included men as well. And second, it affected body systems beyond the menstrual cycle and bone metabolism.

“Low energy availability switches off all the hormone control systems in the brain and that has all the knock-on effects that we recognize [with RED-S]. The bone health issues, menstrual issues, the mood issues, the gut issues, all these things,” said Nicky.

That’s where it gets tricky, because most people don’t connect mood swings or frequent bloating to undereating. And that’s exactly what happened to Katie Schofield, a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand.  

 

“I would have a lot of bloating. And just up and down mood swings. I would be crying over little things and just get upset,” Katie said.

 

She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014 – the year the IOC published the statement that defined RED-S for the first time.

 

“It was really fortunate timing. To be around when it first was coined is pretty cool,” said Katie. Less cool, on the other hand, was her experience with RED-S itself.

 

The loss of her menstrual cycle was the first sign that something wasn’t right. However, like many other female athletes, she was told that amenorrhea was normal for women with an active lifestyle. But from her studies in sports nutrition and exercise science, she knew that it might not be that normal.

 

“I was feeling a lot of fatigue,” Katie said. But before she got her RED-S diagnosis, she would explain her symptoms with the fact that she was a professional athlete.

 

“I’m a full-time athlete, so I should be feeling tired. I’m just pushing my body to the limit. Maybe I’m just overtrained or stressed,” Katie said.

 

And that’s another reason why RED-S can be difficult to diagnose: Because the symptoms can be explained by simply being an athlete.

 

“We all feel tired,” said Nicky. “I mean, especially if you’re an athlete, and you’re training a lot.”

 

Sometimes it is hard to pin down what the problem is – not only for the athlete, but also for doctors.

“Ultimately, that’s why RED-S is a diagnosis of exclusion, because you have to make sure that the athlete hasn’t got glandular fever or a medical condition like an underactive thyroid.”

Katie, however, was lucky to find a doctor who knew exactly what was going on with her. “I was doing all those tests, and then I came across a doctor who said, ‘You have RED-S’. That was the first time I had heard of it.”

 

While Katie was never diagnosed with an eating disorder, she said she probably had disordered eating. “It was strange because I wasn’t purposely doing it, but subconsciously I was. I wouldn’t be purging or using medications or anything like that,” she said.

 

Katie also said that the culture in cycling is very focused on being as lean and strong as possible.

“And I being a number’s person, perfectionist, type A personality, it was kind of the worst enemy,” Katie said. Her degree in sports nutrition and sports science also gave her the knowledge of how to manipulate her diet.

 

The emphasis on being lean and hearing comments from some people to other athletes made her believe that she had to lose weight to ride faster. Seeing other riders watch their diet and restrict made her more cautious about her own food intake, even though she had no reason to be concerned about weight because she already was lean.

 

Nicky agrees that the personality of athletes plays a big role in developing RED-S.

 

“There’s a reversible arrow between cause and effect in terms of psychology,” she said.

 

Most athletes like to follow a certain routine and get their training done efficiently. But sometimes, that tendency can “spill over” and turn into too regimented schedules of training and eating.

 

“That’s the underlying personality of many athletes,” Nicky said. For some, this leads to overtraining and/or undereating.

 

“And once you get into that situation, it’s difficult to get out of it. So that’s why [RED-S] is sort of a vicious cycle.”

Die Entdeckung von RED-S: Von der Female Athlete Triade zu RED-S

Die ersten modernen Olympischen Spiele im Jahr 1896 wurden ohne Frauen ausgetragen. Vier Jahre später durften Frauen in fünf Sportarten antreten: Tennis, Segeln, Krocket, Golf und Reitsport. Und von den 997 Athleten waren 22 weiblich.

 

Dies ist aber kein Artikel über die Gleichstellung der Geschlechter im Sport. Vielmehr geht es um ein Syndrom, das entdeckt wurde, weil Frauen an Sportwettkämpfen teilnehmen durften: die Female Athlete Triade.

 

“Das Female Athlete Triad wurde erstmals in den 1980er Jahren von Barbara Drinkwater beschrieben”, sagt Dr. Nicky Keay, eine Sport- und Tanzendokrinologin aus Großbritannien. In ihrer mehr als 30-jährigen Forschungstätigkeit hat sie einen enormen Einfluss auf das Wissen über das Female Athlete Triad und Energieverfügbarkeit im Sport gehabt.

 

Im Jahr 1992 trug das American College of Sports Medicine ein Treffen von Sportmedizin-Experten aus, um das Thema zu erörtern, wobei der Begriff „Female Athlete Triad“ zum ersten Mal definiert wurde: eine Triade von Essstörung, Amenorrhoe und geringer Knochendichte.

 

“Läuferinnen, die mehr Laufkilometer pro Woche hatten und sich genauso ernährten wie ihre Kolleginnen mit geringeren Laufkilometern pro Woche, berichteten häufiger über Menstruationsprobleme und eine schlechte Knochengesundheit”, sagt Nicky.

 

Zwanzig Jahre vor der Konferenz über das Female Athlete Triad in 1992 wurde in den Vereinigten Staaten der Titel IX verabschiedet: ein Gesetz, das Frauen vor Diskriminierung im Bildungsbereich schützt. Danach stieg die Beteiligung von Frauen an sportlichen Aktivitäten sprunghaft an, aber gleichzeitig stieg auch die Zahl der Frauen, die über Menstruationsprobleme berichteten.

 

“Ein häufiges Symptom von Essstörungen bei Frauen ist die Amenorrhöe. (…) Sobald sich eine Menstruationsstörung entwickelt, kann es zu Knochenschwund kommen”, heißt es in dem von Barbara Drinkwater und weiteren Autoren verfassten Kommentar zum Female Athlete Triad.

 

Doch trotz des Namens betrifft das Female Athlete Triad nicht nur Frauen.

 

“Bei Frauen ist es offensichtlicher, weil man das klinische Zeichen der [ausbleibenden] Periode hat”, sagt Nicky.

 

Männer haben keine Periode. Die beiden anderen Faktoren der Triade sind jedoch dieselben – Essstörungen und geringe Knochendichte.

 

Aus diesem Grund wurde 22 Jahre nach der Entdeckung der Female Athlete Triad der Begriff durch einen anderen ersetzt: relatives Energiedefizit im Sport. Kurz gesagt: RED-S.

 

Das IOC veröffentlichte im Jahr 2014 ein Statement zu RED-S, das in zweierlei Hinsicht revolutionär war: Erstens besagte es, dass RED-S auch Männer betrifft. Und zweitens wirkte es sich auch auf andere Körpersysteme als den Menstruationszyklus und den Knochenstoffwechsel aus.

 

“Geringe Energieverfügbarkeit schaltet alle Hormonsteuerungssysteme im Gehirn aus, und das hat all die Auswirkungen, die wir [bei RED-S] erkennen. Probleme mit der Knochengesundheit, Menstruationsprobleme, Stimmungsprobleme, Darmprobleme, all diese Dinge”, sagt Nicky.

 

Und genau da wird es schwierig, denn die meisten Menschen bringen Stimmungsschwankungen oder häufige Blähungen nicht mit einer zu geringen Nahrungsaufnahme in Verbindung. Und genau das ist Katie Schofield, einer ehemaligen Profi-Radrennfahrerin aus Neuseeland, passiert. 

 

“Ich hatte oft Blähungen. Und Stimmungsschwankungen, die auf und ab gingen. Ich habe wegen Kleinigkeiten geweint”, sagt Katie.

 

Bei ihr wurde RED-S in 2014 diagnostiziert – das Jahr, in dem das IOC das Statement veröffentlichte, in dem RED-S zum ersten Mal definiert wurde.

 

“Es war wirklich ein gutes Timing. Es ist ziemlich cool, dabei zu sein, als RED-S anerkannt wurde”, sagt Katie. Weniger cool hingegen war ihre Erfahrung mit RED-S selbst.

 

Das Ausbleiben ihres Menstruationszyklus war das erste Anzeichen dafür, dass etwas nicht stimmte. Wie vielen anderen Sportlerinnen wurde ihr jedoch gesagt, dass Amenorrhoe für Frauen mit einem aktiven Lebensstil normal sei. Da sie jedoch Sporternährung und Sportwissenschaft studiert hat, wusste sie jedoch, dass dies nicht ganz normal war.

 

“Ich fühlte mich oft sehr müde”, sagt Katie. Doch bevor sie ihre RED-S-Diagnose erhielt, erklärte sie ihre Symptome mit der Tatsache, dass sie Leistungssportlerin war.

 

“Ich bin Profisportlerin, also sollte ich mich müde fühlen. Ich bringe meinen Körper einfach an seine Grenzen. Vielleicht bin ich einfach übertrainiert oder gestresst”, sagt Katie.

 

Und das ist ein weiterer Grund, warum RED-S schwer zu diagnostizieren ist: Die Symptome werden einfach dadurch erklärt, dass man viel Sport macht.

 

“Wir alle fühlen uns müde”, sagt Nicky. “Ich meine, besonders wenn man ein Sportler ist und viel trainiert.”

 

Manchmal ist es schwer herauszufinden, was das Problem ist – nicht nur für Athleten, sondern auch für Ärzte.

 

“Letztlich ist RED-S deshalb eine Ausschlussdiagnose, weil man sichergehen muss, dass der Sportler nicht an Drüsenfieber oder einer Krankheit wie einer Schilddrüsenunterfunktion leidet”, sagt Nicky.

 

Katie hatte jedoch das Glück, einen Arzt zu finden, der genau wusste, was mit ihr los war. “Ich habe all diese Tests gemacht, und dann stieß ich auf einen Arzt, der meinte: ‘Sie haben RED-S’. Das war das erste Mal, dass ich davon gehört habe.”

 

Obwohl bei Katie nie eine Essstörung diagnostiziert wurde, sagt sie, dass sie wahrscheinlich ein gestörtes Essverhalten hatte. “Es war seltsam, weil ich es nicht absichtlich gemacht habe, sondern unbewusst. Ich habe mich nicht erbrochen oder Abführmittel genommen oder so etwas”, sagt sie.

 

Katie sagt auch, dass die Kultur im Radsport sehr darauf ausgerichtet ist, so schlank und stark wie möglich zu sein.

 

“Und da ich ein Zahlenmensch, Perfektionist, Typ-A-Persönlichkeit bin, war das sozusagen mein schlimmster Feind”, sagt Katie. Durch ihren Bachelor-Abschluss in Sporternährung und Sportwissenschaft weiß sie auch, wie sie ihre Ernährung manipulieren kann.

 

Die Betonung darauf, ein geringes Gewicht beizubehalten und die Kommentare einiger Leute über andere Sportler brachten sie zu der Überzeugung, dass sie abnehmen müsse, um schneller zu sein. Sie sah, wie andere Radfahrerinnen auf ihre Ernährung achteten und weniger aßen, weshalb sie ebenfalls anfing, ihre Ernährung einzuschränken – und das, obwohl sie bereits schlank war.

 

Nicky stimmt zu, dass die Persönlichkeit von Sportlern eine große Rolle bei der Entwicklung von RED-S spielt. “Es gibt eine klare Beziehung zwischen Ursache und Wirkung in Bezug auf die Psychologie von RED-S”, sagt sie.

 

Die meisten Sportler folgen gerne einer bestimmten Routine, um ihr Training möglichst effizient zu gestalten. Aber manchmal kann diese Tendenz “überschwappen” und zu stark reglementierten Trainings- und Ernährungsplänen führen.

 

“Das ist die grundlegende Persönlichkeit vieler Sportler”, sagte Nicky. Bei manchen führt dies zu Übertraining und/oder Unterernährung. “Und wenn man einmal in diese Situation geraten ist, ist es schwierig, da wieder herauszukommen. Deshalb ist [RED-S] eine Art Teufelskreis”.

Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

“Smaller = Faster”: How We Can Change the Narrative

Edit
Click here to add content.

“Smaller = Faster”: How We Can Change the Narrative

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

This is the sixth and final part of the series “RED-S: About the Pressure to Perform and Athletes Who Change the Narrative”

Two years after recovering from RED-S, in 2016, Katie Schofield decided to retire from cycling. Without having reached her goals of making it to the Olympic Games.

 

But on a much deeper perspective, she did reach her goal of pushing herself to continuously improve and beat yesterday’s performance.

 

“I achieved being able to race on the world stage and being a professional athlete,” Katie said. “That was a cool experience, but I never reached the pinnacle of the pinnacle.”  

 

When I asked her whether RED-S influenced her decision to retire from track cycling, her answer was a clear “No”. Instead, her own experience with RED-S has led her on the path of researching the syndrome through her PhD in mixed methods approaches. Now, she specializes in researching Low Energy Availability (LEA) and RED-S in elite athletes.

 

“I experienced it and because at the time, no one really knew much about it, it was really intriguing,” Katie said. She started learning more about what happens to our hormone system when we undereat and how the body shuts down certain body functions if it isn’t given the energy it needs to sustain them. But RED-S also goes beyond its physical symptoms.

“There is such a social and psychological element to RED-S that we are not capturing and we’re not understanding,” Katie said. “But that’s where my PhD came into fruition.” 

Using her PhD in mixed methods approaches, she looked at the environments that athletes are exposed to and how that influences athletes’ relationships to food or their body image.

 

“I’m just trying to educate as many athletes, coaches and parents as possible,” Katie said. RED-S is still very complex and research is still in the beginning stages. Nonetheless, information is growing and the message about the dangers of undereating as an athlete is being spread.

 

To athletes who struggle with RED-S, Katie recommends finding someone to talk to, whether that be a GP or a sports nutritionist or someone who had RED-S themselves. Her message to athletes is: “Don’t underestimate the fueling.”

 

Dr Nicky Keay, the sports and dance endocrinologist from the U.K., has a similar message that she shares on her website and blog “Nicky Keay Fitness”. She also publishes articles on the website of the British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASEM).

 

“It’s just about getting the information, the message out there,” she said. “[RED-S] is something that can happen, but it’s something you can do something about.”

 

Alicia Edge, the sports nutritionist from Australia, agrees.

“Normalized eating can go into disordered eating and then eating disorder,” she said. In her work, she sees a lot of athletes who are still at the stage of disordered eating. “Catching that early before it then moves into that eating disorder is definitely always the goal.” 

That’s why her work is focused on discussions with athletes and their coaches – not just in her day-to-day job, but also in her podcast “The Compeat Waffle”. It’s all about early detection and awareness.

 

Georgia Williams, the professional cyclist from New Zealand, agrees. But she also thinks that having fun at the sport you’re doing is the most important thing. “I’m all about just enjoying it,” she said.

 

That mindset also made recovering from RED-S easier, because she knew what she is doing it for. All throughout her recovery process, she kept reminding herself that she would come back stronger.

 

Learning how to give her body enough fuel for the training she’s doing gave her energy back that she didn’t even know she had. And most of all, it seemed to improve her ability to recover from training.

 

“I’m definitely feeling much better. I used to have a hard training session, and I’d be like scrooge for a few days. But now I’m fine the next day,” Georgia said.

 

She even started adjusting her training around her menstrual cycle, and next to nutrition, she also takes recovery days a lot more seriously.

 

“I used to think that every day, I have to do something. But now I actually have a day off and do nothing and don’t feel lazy,” Georgia said. Because that’s what recovery days are for: recovery.

 

Recovering from RED-S also improved her mood and feeling of balance in life. Reducing the amount of stress around training and food allows her to take her mind off of cycling some more.

 

Georgia is now looking forward to hopefully qualifying for this year’s women’s Tour de France, which will be held for the first time ever. She will also represent New Zealand at the Commonwealth Games in the UK and at the World Championships in Australia.

“That’s kind of like a home World’s because they’re just across the ditch,” she said. “That will also be a big goal. I’ve sort of been just out of the Top 10 in the World Champs and the time trial over the last few years, so I’d really like to get the Top 10.” 

Josh Kozelj follows a similar sports philosophy as Georgia, who is all about enjoying exercise rather than forcing it.

 

“Running is the one sport where you can lace up your shoes and go out the door, and you can forget about all your problems,” Josh said.  “You hop on a trail and listen to your footsteps on the gravel, mulch, pavement. It is very much meditative.”

 

That’s why Josh wants to continue running long after he is done with competitive sports. To him, the most motivating aspect of running is the feeling of progress. Running gives you a measure to compare yourself to yourself of two, four, or six months earlier. But chasing after the feeling of progress can also become dangerous – for example when RED-S enters the game.

 

“Probably a month before COVID hit, I ran a personal best on the 3K, and I was feeling good,” Josh said.

 

Now, his energy levels are back to normal and the days when he couldn’t get off the couch are over. “It was not a fun time at all,” Josh said.

 

After recovering from RED-S, Josh has also managed to run the best he has ever run in his life, getting an All-Canadian spot. He’s running high mileage and his body is reacting well, which is a sign that his fueling strategies are working.

 

“I credit that a lot to not overthinking my diet,” Josh said. “I think your body is kind of like an engine of a car. You wouldn’t start a car race under-fueled.”

 

Josh recommends that balance is key in sport. And his definition of “balance” doesn’t only encompass diet, but also social life and relaxation.

 

“If you’re happy in your life, you’ll be happy in running,”

Post Tags

"Dünner = Schneller": Wie wir die Konversation ums Gewicht ändern können

Zwei Jahre nach ihrer Genesung von RED-S beschloss Katie Schofield in 2016, sich vom Radsport zurückzuziehen. Ohne ihr Ziel, an den Olympischen Spielen teilzunehmen, erreicht zu haben.

 

Aber aus einer tiefergehenden Perspektive betrachtet, hat sie ihr Ziel erreicht, sich ständig zu verbessern und die Leistung von gestern zu übertreffen.

 

“Ich habe es geschafft, auf der Weltbühne zu Rad zu fahren und eine professionelle Athletin zu sein”, sagte Katie. “Das war eine coole Erfahrung, aber ich habe nie den Höhepunkt des Höhepunkts erreicht.”

 

Als ich sie fragte, ob RED-S ihre Entscheidung, sich vom Bahnradsport zurückzuziehen, beeinflusst hat, war ihre Antwort ein klares “Nein”. Stattdessen hat ihre Erfahrung mit RED-S sie auf den Weg der Forschung über RED-S gebracht, indem sie mit gemischten Methoden promovierte. Jetzt ist sie auf die Erforschung von Low Energy Availability (LEA) und RED-S bei Spitzensportlern spezialisiert.

 

“Ich habe diese Erfahrung gemacht, und da zu der Zeit niemand viel darüber wusste, war es wirklich faszinierend”, sagte Katie. Sie begann, mehr darüber zu lernen, was mit unserem Hormonsystem passiert, wenn wir zu wenig essen, und wie der Körper bestimmte Körperfunktionen herunterfährt, wenn er nicht die Energie erhält, die er zu deren Aufrechterhaltung braucht. Aber RED-S geht auch über die körperlichen Symptome hinaus.

 

“Es gibt ein soziales und psychologisches Element bei RED-S, das wir nicht erfassen und nicht verstehen”, sagt Katie. “Aber das ist der Punkt, an dem meine Doktorarbeit Früchte trägt.”

 

Im Rahmen ihrer Doktorarbeit über gemischte Methoden untersuchte sie das Umfeld, dem Sportler ausgesetzt sind, und wie dieses die Beziehung der Sportler zum Essen oder ihr Körperbild beeinflusst.

 

“Ich versuche einfach, so viele Sportler, Trainer und Eltern wie möglich aufzuklären”, sagte Katie. RED-S ist immer noch sehr komplex und die Forschung befindet sich noch in den Anfängen. Nichtsdestotrotz wächst die Zahl der Informationen, und die Botschaft über die Gefahren von Unterernährung bei Sportlern wird immer weiter verbreitet.

 

Sportlern, die mit RED-S zu kämpfen haben, empfiehlt Katie, jemanden zum Reden zu finden, sei es ein Hausarzt, ein Sporternährungsberater oder jemand, der selbst RED-S hat oder hatte. Ihre Botschaft an Sportler lautet: “Unterschätze nicht die Verpflegung.”

 

Dr. Nicky Keay, eine Sport- und Tanzendokrinologin aus Großbritannien, hat eine ähnliche Botschaft, die sie auf ihrer Website und ihrem Blog “Nicky Keay Fitness” verbreitet. Sie veröffentlicht auch Artikel auf der Website der British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASEM).

 

“Es geht nur darum, die Informationen und die Botschaft zu verbreiten”, sagt sie. “RED-S ist etwas, das passieren kann, aber es ist etwas, wogegen man etwas tun kann.”

 

Alicia Edge, eine Sporternährungsberaterin aus Australien, stimmt dem zu.

 

“Normalisiertes Essen kann in gestörtes Essen und dann in eine Essstörung übergehen”, sagte sie. In ihrer Arbeit sieht sie viele Sportler, die sich noch in der Phase der Essstörung befinden. “Das frühzeitige Auffangen, bevor es zu einer Essstörung kommt, ist auf jeden Fall immer das Ziel.

 

Deshalb liegt der Schwerpunkt ihrer Arbeit auf Gesprächen mit Sportlern und ihren Trainern – nicht nur in ihrem Berufsalltag, sondern auch in ihrem Podcast “The Compeat Waffle”. Es geht um Früherkennung und Bewusstsein.

 

Das sieht auch die neuseeländische Profi-Radsportlerin Georgia Williams so. Sie ist aber auch der Meinung, dass es am wichtigsten ist, Spaß an dem Sport zu haben, den man betreibt. “Mir geht es nur darum, es zu genießen”, sagt sie.

 

Mit dieser Einstellung war es auch leichter, sich von RED-S zu erholen, weil sie wusste, wofür sie es tat. Während ihres gesamten Genesungsprozesses erinnerte sie sich immer wieder daran, dass sie gestärkt zurückkommen würde.

 

Indem sie lernte, wie sie ihren Körper mit ausreichend Energie für ihr Training versorgen konnte, bekam sie Energie zurück, von der sie nicht einmal wusste, dass sie sie hatte. Und vor allem schien es ihre Fähigkeit zu verbessern, sich vom Training zu erholen.

 

“Ich fühle mich definitiv viel besser. Früher war ich nach einer harten Trainingseinheit ein paar Tage lang ziemlich erschöpft. Aber jetzt geht es mir am nächsten Tag gut”, sagte Georgia.

 

Sie hat sogar begonnen, ihr Training auf ihren Menstruationszyklus abzustimmen, und neben der Ernährung nimmt sie auch die Erholungstage viel ernster.

 

“Früher habe ich gedacht, dass ich jeden Tag etwas tun muss. Aber jetzt habe ich tatsächlich einen Tag frei und tue nichts und fühle mich nicht faul”, sagt Georgia. Denn dafür sind Ruhetage ja da: zur Erholung.

 

Die Erholung von RED-S hat auch ihre Stimmung und ihr Gefühl der Ausgeglichenheit im Leben verbessert. Durch die Verringerung des Stresses, der mit dem Training und dem Essen verbunden ist, kann sie sich besser vom Radsport ablenken.

 

Georgia hat bei der diesjährigen Tour de France der Frauen teilgenommen, die zum ersten Mal überhaupt ausgetragen wurde. Außerdem hat sie Neuseeland bei den Commonwealth Games im Vereinigten Königreich vertreten. In ein paar Wochen finden die Weltmeisterschaften in Australien statt.

 

“Das ist so etwas wie eine Heim-WM, denn die sind gleich hinter dem Graben”, sagte sie. “Das wird auch ein großes Ziel sein. In den letzten Jahren war ich bei den Weltmeisterschaften und im Zeitfahren immer knapp außerhalb der Top 10, also würde ich wirklich gerne in die Top 10 kommen.”

 

Josh Kozelj verfolgt eine ähnliche Philosophie wie Georgia, der es vor allem um den Spaß an der Bewegung geht, anstatt sie zu erzwingen.

 

“Laufen ist die einzige Sportart, bei der man die Schuhe schnüren und vor die Tür gehen kann und alle Probleme vergessen kann”, sagt Josh. “Man fängt an zu laufen und hört seine Schritte auf dem Kies, dem Mulch und dem Asphalt. Das hat etwas sehr Meditatives.”

 

Aus diesem Grund möchte Josh auch noch lange nach seiner Zeit als Leistungssportler weiterlaufen. Für ihn ist der motivierendste Aspekt des Laufens das Gefühl des Fortschritts. Beim Laufen kann man sich mit sich selbst vergleichen, wenn man zwei, vier oder sechs Monate zuvor gelaufen ist. Dem Gefühl des Fortschritts nachzujagen kann aber auch gefährlich werden – zum Beispiel, wenn RED-S ins Spiel kommt.

 

“Wahrscheinlich einen Monat vor dem Auftreten von COVID bin ich eine persönliche Bestleistung über 3 km gelaufen und habe mich gut gefühlt”, sagt Josh.

 

Jetzt ist sein Energielevel wieder normal, und die Tage, an denen er sich nicht von der Couch erheben konnte, sind vorbei. “Es war überhaupt keine schöne Zeit”, sagte Josh.

 

Nachdem er sich von RED-S erholt hat, ist es Josh auch gelungen, so gut zu laufen wie noch nie in seinem Leben und einen Platz in der All-Canadian-Auswahl zu bekommen. Sein Körper reagiert gut auf die höheren Trainingsumfänge, was ein Zeichen dafür ist, dass seine Ernährungsstrategien funktionieren.

 

“Das liegt vor allem daran, dass ich nicht zu viel über meine Ernährung nachdenke”, sagt Josh. “Ich denke, dein Körper ist wie der Motor eines Autos. Man würde ein Autorennen nicht mit zu wenig Treibstoff beginnen.”

 

Josh empfiehlt, dass Ausgewogenheit im Sport der Schlüssel ist. Und seine Definition von “Gleichgewicht” umfasst nicht nur die Ernährung, sondern auch das soziale Leben und die Entspannung.

 

“Wenn du in deinem Leben glücklich bist, wirst du auch beim Laufen glücklich sein”.

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 

Meet Josh

Josh Kozelj is a Canadian journalist and runner. During his undergraduate studies, he competed in cross-country and track and field for the University of Victoria in Canada, where he developed RED-S in his second year. He is now pursuing a master’s degree in journalism. 

Meet Alicia

Alicia Edge is the cofounder of Compeat Nutrition. She works as a sports nutritionist, where she talks to a lot of athletes who developed RED-S. She also shares her knowledge in her podcast “The Compeat Waffle.”

Meet Georgia

Georgia Williams is a professional road cyclist from New Zealand. Her biggest achievement in cycling is a silver medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2018. After that, she decided to dedicate a few months to her recovery from RED-S. Now, she is hoping to compete at the women’s Tour de France this summer. 

Meet Nicky

Dr Nicky Keay is a sport and dance endocrinologist and her passion for the matter shows not only in the row of degrees she holds, but also in the number of publications on RED-S, bone health, and related conditions. She conducts research on sports and dance endocrinology as a clinical lecturer at University College London and Durham University.

Meet Katie

Katie Schofield is a former professional track cyclist from New Zealand. She was diagnosed with RED-S in 2014, which inspired her to pursue a PhD in mixed methods approaches, which helps her to research Low Energy Availability and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport. 

What is Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S)?

RED-S the manifestation of symptoms as a result of LEA. The 2014 statement on RED-S published by the International Olympic Committee defines RED-S as a syndrome that comes with changes to the “physiological function including, but not limited to, metabolic rate, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, cardiovascular health.” To say it in simple words, RED-S can have far-reaching health consequences such as osteoporosis, chronic fatigue syndrome or stress fractures. In some cases, RED-S can also have a psychological factor.

What is Low Energy Availability (LEA)?

Low energy availability (LEA) is the scientific term for undereating in athletes. When the calorie intake drops below the required amount of energy that’s needed for daily life and training load, the body saves energy by shutting down body functions.

Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

Into the RED-S: Duathlon World Champion Simon Hoyden on Energy Deficiency in Sport

Edit
Click here to add content.

Into the RED-S: Duathlon World Champion Simon Hoyden on Energy Deficiency in Sport

Halfway through his twenties, Simon Hoyden couldn’t make it through a day without spending a large portion of the afternoon asleep. He would get up at 9, have lunch around noon and get so tired that he had no other choice than to sleep. Waking up at 6 p.m., he spent the rest of the night awake, trying to go back to sleep.

 

“Some nights I laid awake for two to three hours in the early morning, just to fall back asleep around six a.m. My sleep rhythm was completely destroyed,” says Hoyden, who won the duathlon world championship in 2015. “I would never wish this upon anyone.”

 

In the quest for a reason for his sleep problems, he went to one doctor after another. The most common response was: “It’s a mental health problem.” But Hoyden was certain that his symptoms were beyond mental health.

 

A disrupted sleep cycle was not the only issue he had to deal with. As a passionate runner and triathlete from Germany, Hoyden battled multiple injuries–ranging from tendonitis to bursitis to shin splints. He was constantly sick, which he attributed to a weak immune system. On top of it all, he suffered from hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue.

 

Over the course of the years, the number of doctors he consulted climbed up to 15. And no one could offer him a definite answer to what caused these problems. Until he saw a naturopath, who diagnosed Hoyden with chronic fatigue syndrome at the age of 28. And at the bottom of it all, he found that his fatigue was caused by a relative energy deficiency in sport (or RED-S) that had lasted for almost 15 years.

 

“It all started at the age of 14 or 15, when I joined the local athletics club,” Hoyden says. “We would have a hard track workout and at that age, I didn’t really know how to fuel myself properly. So we practiced for two or three hours a day and by the time I had food, I would rather binge instead of eat.”

Simon Hoyden

In his teenage years, Hoyden quickly climbed up the ranks, running 33 minutes for a 10k at age 17. But four years later, at 21, the clock would still show 33 minutes when he crossed the finish line.

 

“At some point, I just stopped improving,” he says. “I was extremely tired and had to drag myself to every practice.”

 

When an athlete stops developing, the first factor to look at is training. He tried to switch up his training plan, his coaches, and even teams.

 

“I always thought my training was the reason I didn’t get faster,” he says. “But I never asked myself if my energy input fuels the training I do.”

 

Diagnosing RED-S isn’t always clear-cut. It’s not obvious. “Being in an energy deficiency doesn’t mean you have to be skinny,” Hoyden says. “I was always more of an athletic body type that carries a lot of muscle, so when I was doing really bad, I tended to get a lot of water retention and people would point out how big my thighs were.”

 

If the energy input doesn’t equal the energy output, the body is under immense stress because it isn’t given enough resources to repair the micro-damage caused by a workout. As a result, the metabolism slows down, non-essential biological systems are at risk of shutting down, and inflammatory markers shoot up.

 

“That’s when athletes start getting overuse injuries because their body can’t compensate for the insufficient energy intake,” Hoyden says.

 

In women, the slowdown of the metabolism has an additional effect on their bodies: a deficiency in the hormone estrogen and the loss of the menstrual cycle. This further affects the bone metabolism, which leads to a reduction of the bone mineral density and stress fractures.

 

“The body can withstand an energy deficiency for years and the athlete won’t even notice that something is wrong. Especially if you’re very ambitious it’s hard to overhear those signals,” Hoyden says. “And once you’re at this point of no return, it’s a long process of recovery.”

 

After all those years of searching for the right diagnosis, Hoyden was left spending several thousand euros on recovery from RED-S and chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

“It doesn’t happen overnight,” he says. He started treatment in 2017, which also meant he had to make great changes to his everyday life choices. With the help of a nutritionist, he figured out how much food he actually needs and, more importantly, how much carbs, fats and protein his diet should contain.

 

“There’s carbs and fats, which provide us with the energy to keep our body running. And then there’s protein, which we need to build our house, hence our body,” Hoyden explains. If either one or both of these macronutrients are lacking, our ability to perform decreases.

 

Another commonly accepted mistake is fasted training. Hoyden recommends exercise on an empty stomach only for highly experienced athletes. “If you don’t fuel yourself correctly after a fasted run, it only causes an energy deficiency that can lead to decreasing performance and extreme exhaustion.”

 

Over the years that Hoyden has been working as a private coach, he had a lot of athletes ask him “Why am I so tired? Why do I binge at night?” To him, the answer is a simple question: “When do you fuel your car–before or after you reached your destination?”

 

Athletes should treat their bodies like their cars–filling them up with fuel before they head out for a run or a bike ride, not after. That doesn’t only make exercising more enjoyable, but also prevents injuries and sickness (quite literally) in the long run.

 

Hoyden also advises his athletes to get enough rest. “I decided to get a private coach. And I got a training plan that contained two rest days a week. At first, I thought he was kidding me,” he says. “But now that I have my own coaching certification, I understand why rest is important.”

 

While taking a break from endurance sports, Hoyden decided to enter the world of fitness. He received his fitness coaching license in 2019, which he topped off with an endurance and personal coaching license in 2020.

 

“Nutrition is a central part of fitness and weightlifting, whereas in endurance sports it’s barely talked about,” he says. “The problem is that if we don’t change our education system, the problem will persist.”

 

That’s why Hoyden is planning to start his own team of athletes to educate them about the interconnection of nutrition and exercise. “I want to pass on my experiences and make a difference.”

Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 
Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

“It Takes Failures to Learn”: Elite Runner Meg Lewis-Schneider’s Journey Through Four Bone Injuries

Edit
Click here to add content.

“It Takes Failures to Learn”: Elite Runner Meg Lewis-Schneider’s Journey Through Four Bone Injuries

Click here to read in English/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

“There’s no other sport that I’ve been involved in where I just love it so much. I love being in nature, I love feeling empowered and inspired,” said Meg Lewis-Schneider. For the 26-year-old freelance journalist from Canada, the sport is running.

 

“When I was a kid, I couldn’t decide on one sport because I loved them all.” It was only after she finished her degree in Radio and Television that she picked up running—just for fun. But when she started entering races, it quickly became more than just a hobby. “I was so committed to my training and I started to see improvements in every race I did. I was completely hooked.”

 

While she ran one personal record after another, Meg experienced massive success in running right from the start, running some fast elite standard times. In 2018, Meg finished third at the Victoria Half Marathon on Vancouver Island, Canada, in one hour and fifteen minutes—just three years after her half marathon debut.

 

But she didn’t know that this success would be short-lived. “So often, when we get good at something, we start to think: OK, what else can I do to make myself better?” Meg said. She started mixing up her workout routine with strength training and yoga, and decided to change up her diet. It seemed to be the key to keep improving.

 

Then she got sidelined by a navicular stress fracture. “I had no idea what caused it and I just thought it’s a result of hard training and pushing my limits. I didn’t take it too seriously. I thought I would just let it heal and then I’d get back to running and do the same thing that I was doing.”

 

But the bone injuries kept coming. First the navicular stress fracture, then the fifth metatarsal and sacral, topped with a stress reaction in the femoral neck. After her third stress fracture at the beginning of this year, she began looking for reasons and started seeing a dietitian and a sports doctor.

 

That’s when she realized that the stress fractures were just the top of the iceberg. Down below, there was a row of connected issues: relative energy deficiency, low bone mineral density and amenorrhea, which is the medical term for the loss of the menstrual cycle. All of these combined to form the female athlete triad. The disorder often goes by unrecognized because the symptoms are subtle and can be mistaken as a side effect of hard training.

 

When Meg changed up her diet and went vegan, she also found that her nutrition intake was not matching her output, which got her into a relative energy deficiency in sport, also called RED-S. “I was riding a fine line because the more running or the more cardio you do, the more you lose your appetite,” Meg said.

 

While her personal bests for the 10K and half marathon kept dropping, her weight did too. Her teammates noticed that she lost weight and looked too skinny, but she didn’t take their opinions seriously. “I thought I looked this way because I’m training more and I’m faster.”

 

But the damage doesn’t show until later on, when the low bone density leads to stress fractures and even osteoporosis. “I dug my own hole when I could have been avoiding all those signs and warnings,” Meg said.

 

One of these warnings can be amenorrhea, which is one of the key symptoms of the female athlete triad. Amenorrhea can have many causes ranging from stress to overtraining to undereating, which ultimately result in low estrogen levels and a missing period. But for Meg, this warning sign remained undetected.

“I was in RED-S and I didn’t know because I was also on birth control. And when you’re on birth control, it masks the problem because you’re still getting [your] period. But I didn’t know that it was actually fake,” Meg said.

 

Birth control pills are a common treatment for amenorrhea because they bring back the period. But compared to the natural hormonal system of the body, birth control pills are not as efficient in maintaining the bone mineral density. The hormone estrogen is a crucial regulator for the bone metabolism in both women and men. And when low estrogen levels remain undetected because they are hidden behind an “artificial” menstrual cycle due to birth control pills, it can have devastating impacts on the bone mineral density.

 

“You don’t notice the consequences because it takes a while for the damage to kick in,” Meg said. The third symptom of the female athlete triad, a low bone mineral density, develops over several years. And once it is detected, it is already too late to turn around and make the necessary changes in diet and training. “It’s not going to take four months. It’s not going to take a year or two to reverse the damage.”

 

Meg learned that the hard way, when she transitioned back into training after her sacral stress fracture. “By July I got my period back and I was off birth control. I thought I’m healthy and I’m going to get back to running the way I used to run.”

 

She started running that same month, only to find herself knocked down by another bone injury a month later. After building up her bone density for six months, the diagnosis was both shocking and unexpected at first. But even though stress fractures are devastating to anyone who loves running, Meg also sees this row of injuries as a chance.

 

Being injured during a global pandemic pushed her into finding other passions and hobbies. “Through my other injuries, I would try to go to the pool and biking, but I’m being kinder to myself these days. I don’t need to cross-train like the machine to feel good,” she said. 

Instead, she discovered that baking helps to keep her positive, as well as spending more time with friends. Meg loves an upbeat music playlist that helps the mood and she also tried gratitude journaling. “Even when we’re struggling, there’s still so much to be thankful for,” she said. Along with walks in nature, it’s inspiring books and podcasts that get her through both the pandemic and the injury.

 

“Sometimes it takes all these setbacks or failures to really learn. I know this is all part of the process,” Meg said. “The biggest lesson for me is that I have to take things much slower and be way more patient and compassionate for myself.”

 

To run healthy, it takes more than a regular training schedule. It also takes good nutrition, enough rest and the ability to listen to the body. On her blog, she writes: “I have gained way more from my setbacks than I have from any victory. I may have made too many mistakes and suffered far too many injuries, but I am not discouraged.”

 

One of Meg’s biggest goals for the future is to get up from sitting on the sidelines and get out running on the roads again. “I have so much fire inside me and once my bone health is restored and I’m fully healthy, I want to get back to running and prove that I can be much better than the former version of myself.”

Meg Lewis-Schneider über RED-S und Female Athlete Triad

„Es gibt keinen anderen Sport, den ich so sehr liebe. Ich mag es, in der Natur zu sein und mich inspiriert zu fühlen,“ sagt Meg Lewis-Schneider. Für die 26-jährige freiberufliche Journalistin aus Kanada ist dieser Sport Laufen.

 

„Als Kind konnte ich mich nicht für eine Sportart entscheiden, weil ich sie alle mochte.“ Erst nachdem Meg ihr Studium im Bereich Rundfunkjournalismus abschloss, fing sie mit dem Laufen an – nur zum Spaß. Aber als sie begann, auch an Wettkämpfen teilzunehmen, wurde das Laufen schnell mehr als nur ein Hobby.

 

„Ich habe so hart trainiert und konnte mich bei jedem Wettkampf verbessern. Ich war völlig begeistert.“ Meg war von Anfang an extrem erfolgreich, lief eine Bestzeit nach der anderen, darunter auch einige schnelle Elite-Normzeiten. Im Jahr 2018 lief sie beim Victoria-Halbmarathon auf der Vancouver Island in Kanada ihre Bestzeit von 1:15h – nur drei Jahre nach ihrem Halbmarathon-Debüt.

 

„So oft, wenn wir in etwas richtig gut werden, dann fangen wir an zu denken: OK, was kann ich noch tun, um mich zu verbessern?“, sagt Meg. Daher begann sie, ihre Trainingsroutine mit Krafttraining und Yoga aufzufrischen, und beschloss, ihre Ernährung umzustellen.

Doch dann bekam sie eine Stressfraktur im Kahnbein des Fußes, wodurch sie zu einer Trainingspause gezwungen wurde. „Ich hatte keine Ahnung, was die Ursache für die Fraktur war, und ich dachte einfach, das harte Training und ständige Ausreizen der körperlichen Grenzen wären der Auslöser. Deshalb habe ich den Ermüdungsbruch nicht allzu ernst genommen. Ich dachte, wenn ich es einfach heilen lasse und dann wieder mit dem Laufen beginne, kann ich genau so weiter machen, wie ich es tat.“

 

Aber die Kahnbein-Stressfraktur blieb nicht die einzige. Wenige Zeit später reihten sich auch Frakturen im fünften Mittelfußknochen, Kreuzbein und Schenkelhals dazu. Nach ihrer dritten Stressfraktur am Anfang dieses Jahres fing sie an, nach Gründen zu suchen.

 

Im Gespräch mit einem Ernährungsberater und einem Sportarzt wurde ihr klar, dass die Ermüdungsbrüche nur die Spitze des Eisbergs waren. Darunter gab es eine Reihe miteinander weiterer Probleme: relatives Energiedefizit (RED-S), geringe Knochendichte und Amenorrhoe, das Ausbleiben des Menstruationszyklus. All diese Faktoren zusammen bilden das Female Athlete Triad – zu Deutsch, die Triade der sporttreibenden Frau. Die Kombination der einzelnen Symptome bleibt oft unerkannt, weil sie subtil sind und auch als Nebenwirkung von hartem Training auftreten können.

 

Als Meg ihre Ernährung umgestellte und beschloss, sich vegan zu ernähren, nahm sie nicht die gleiche Menge an Energie auf, die sie durch den Sport verbrauchte. Dadurch geriet sie in einen relativen Energiemangel im Sport, abgekürzt auch RED-S genannt. „Ich bewegte mich auf einem schmalen Grat. Denn je mehr man läuft oder je mehr Ausdauersport man macht, desto weniger Appetit hat man“, sagt Meg.

 

Während ihre Bestzeiten auf die zehn und 21 Kilometer immer schneller wurden, nahm sie auch weiter Gewicht ab. Ihre Teamkollegen wiesen sie darauf hin, dass sie abgenommen hatte und zu dünn aussah, aber sie nahm ihre Meinung nicht ernst. „Ich dachte, ich sehe so aus, weil ich mehr trainiere und schneller bin.“

 

Der Schaden, der entstehen kann, wenn das Energiedefizit im Sport bestehen bleibt, zeigt sich erst später. „Ich habe mir ein eigenes Loch gegraben, obwohl ich all diese Anzeichen und Warnungen hätte ernst nehmen können“, sagt Meg. 

 

Wenn der Körper über längere Zeit einer Unterversorgung mit Energie oder Übertraining ausgesetzt ist, werden nicht überlebenswichtige Prozesse heruntergefahren und die Knochengesundheit negativ beeinträchtigt. Das bedeutet zum Beispiel, dass das Immunsystem geschwächt und die Ruheherzfrequenz niedrig ist. Bei Frauen kann es zum Ausbleiben der Periode kommen. Bei Meg blieb dieses Warnzeichen allerdings aus.

Stattdessen entdeckte Meg, dass sie gerne backt und Zeit mit Freunden verbringt, weil es ihr hilft, positiv zu bleiben. Sie liebt gute Musik und „gratitude journaling“, bei dem man jeden Tag fünf Dinge aufschreibt, über die man dankbar ist. „Selbst in schwierigen Zeiten gibt es immer noch so viel, wofür wir dankbar sein können,“ sagt Meg. Neben Spaziergängen in der Natur sind es auch inspirierende Bücher und Podcasts, die sie sowohl durch die Pandemie, als auch durch die Verletzung bringen.

„Manchmal braucht es all diese Rückschläge oder Misserfolge, um wirklich zu lernen. All dies ist Teil des Lernprozesses,“ sagt Meg. „Die wichtigste Lektion für mich ist, dass ich vieles langsamer angehen muss und geduldiger und mitfühlender mit mir selbst sein muss.“

Denn um gesund zu laufen, braucht es mehr als einen regelmäßigen Trainingsplan. Es braucht auch eine gute Ernährung, genügend Ruhetage und die Fähigkeit, auf den Körper zu hören. Auf ihrem Blog schreibt Meg: „Ich habe aus meinen Rückschlägen viel mehr gewonnen als aus jedem Sieg. Ich habe vielleicht zu viele Fehler gemacht und viel zu viele Verletzungen durchgemacht, aber ich lasse mich nicht entmutigen.“

Eines von Megs größten Zielen für die Zukunft ist es, wieder verletzungsfrei laufen zu können. „Ich habe so viel Feuer in mir, und wenn meine Knochengesundheit wiederhergestellt ist und ich völlig gesund bin, möchte ich wieder laufen und beweisen, dass ich viel besser sein kann als die frühere Version von mir selbst.“

 

 

Stattdessen entdeckte Meg, dass sie gerne backt und Zeit mit Freunden verbringt, weil es ihr hilft, positiv zu bleiben. Sie liebt gute Musik und „gratitude journaling“, bei dem man jeden Tag fünf Dinge aufschreibt, über die man dankbar ist. „Selbst in schwierigen Zeiten gibt es immer noch so viel, wofür wir dankbar sein können“, sagt Meg. Neben Spaziergängen in der Natur sind es auch inspirierende Bücher und Podcasts, die sie sowohl durch die Pandemie, als auch durch die Verletzung bringen.

 

„Manchmal braucht es all diese Rückschläge oder Misserfolge, um wirklich zu lernen. All dies ist Teil des Lernprozesses“, sagt Meg. „Die wichtigste Lektion für mich ist, dass ich vieles langsamer angehen muss und geduldiger und mitfühlender mit mir selbst sein muss.“

 

Denn um gesund zu laufen, braucht es mehr als einen regelmäßigen Trainingsplan. Es braucht auch eine gute Ernährung, genügend Ruhetage und die Fähigkeit, auf den Körper zu hören. Auf ihrem Blog schreibt Meg: „Ich habe aus meinen Rückschlägen viel mehr gewonnen als aus jedem Sieg. Ich habe vielleicht zu viele Fehler gemacht und viel zu viele Verletzungen durchgemacht, aber ich lasse mich nicht entmutigen.“

 

Eines von Megs größten Zielen für die Zukunft ist es, wieder verletzungsfrei laufen zu können. „Ich habe so viel Feuer in mir, und wenn meine Knochengesundheit wiederhergestellt ist und ich völlig gesund bin, möchte ich wieder laufen und beweisen, dass ich viel besser sein kann als die frühere Version von mir selbst.“

 

 

Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 
Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

100K at 16 Years Old: Lucy Bartholomew’s Journey into Ultra-Running

Edit
Click here to add content.

100K at 16 Years Old: Lucy Bartholomew's Journey Into Ultra-Running

While most 16-year-olds were doing what most teenagers do—partying, drinking, trying new things—Australian Lucy Bartholomew ran her first 100k. What started with running alongside her dad and supporting him at races, had turned into a passion of her own. And while the passion stayed, the hobby soon turned into a profession.

 

Now, at 24, Bartholomew is still considered a “young gun” in the sport of ultra-running, although she has already run more ultramarathons than her age.

 

For Bartholomew, the journey into the world of ultra-running began when her dad, a marathoner, decided to run even longer distances of 50K and more. Between work, school and training, there was little time left to share a good conversation. By sharing their runs, there was suddenly a way to spend more time with each other. “We would just run until we had nothing else to say to each other, we got hungry and then we would turn around.”

 

When her dad lined up for his first 100K race, 14-year-old Lucy Bartholomew was watching him run from the sidelines. At least, that’s what she was supposed to do. Instead, she would do what she “had learned to do, which was just running”, following the course and catching up to her dad. She wouldn’t cross the finish line as a race participant this day, but it was the day she discovered her passion for ultra-running.

 

“I saw the front of the pack looking amazing on the trail. I saw the middle of the pack working towards a goal and achieving something incredible. And then I saw the back of the pack of people that were running with a cake in one hand and a coke in the other hand,” Bartholomew said. “I was like this is incredible. I can jog and I can eat a lot.”

 

She was going to be 16 soon, so she emailed all the ultramarathon events she could find, asking to let her race. However, signing up for an ultramarathon at 16 years old, Bartholomew had to run against strong headwind. After doing a lot of persuasion, only one event would let her race under certain conditions: she must run alongside her dad, write a nutrition plan and get medical checks. But still, she was experiencing a lot of backlash when people started saying ultra-running would leave her injured or mentally cracked up or stunt in growth. Some would say her dad was a bad parent for letting her run an ultramarathon.

 

“I’m super stubborn and when I want to do something, I’ll do it,” Bartholomew said. So she raced her first official 100K race and finished in twelve and a half hours, smiling her way through it because there were people who wanted to see her pull out of the race. But she proved them wrong. And a year later, when she was allowed to run on her own, she finished in nine hours—three and a half hours faster.

Lucy Bartholomew

“They invented a whole new category for me, the under-20s,” said Bartholomew. Although she was officially allowed to race as she got older, she still had to prove her commitment to the sport of ultra-running in a rebellious way. So she signed up for a 250K stage race through the Simpson Desert in Australia. When she broke the news to her dad at the finish line of another ultramarathon, a row of fights and discussions followed. And they ended in complete silence the day Bartholomew showed her dad her tickets to Queensland.

 

“I think he saw 250 kilometers as a lot. He was just being a dad,” Bartholomew said. But even without the support of her dad, she followed through with her plan. She started working at an Australian bakery franchise, where she would pull the bread out of the oven in the morning, put them in the shelves, then go to school and come back in the evening to sell the remaining bread. She saved up all her money and traveled to Queensland, where she would run through the Simpson desert for four days. “I ended up coming in second overall in the race and I finished it and I went back home. I washed my clothes and I went to school the next day.”

 

But it wasn’t until Bartholomew was featured on the Runner’s World Magazine front cover that the icy atmosphere at home vanished. “He didn’t even know how I had done because he wasn’t interested. But when he saw how happy I was that I was surrounded by such amazing people who were looking up to me, he realized that I will go to the races and I’ll make it work. And he can either support me or I’ll just do it without his support.”

 

The last year of high school flew by quickly and Bartholomew decided to take a gap year to travel and run around the world. Eventually, her dad would join her to run the Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc (UTMB) and the Matterhorn Ultramarathon in Europe. At the end of her gap year, she knew that running was something she wanted to continue professionally. “The things I learned is more than I learned in school, just from traveling and meeting people.”

 

Sponsors started noticing Bartholomew and while her hobby slowly turned into her job, her gap year turned into two gap years, then three, four. Instead of going to university, Bartholomew competed in numerous ultramarathons overseas, including the UTMB in France and the Western States 100Miler in the United States. But for her, ultra-running was exactly what she wanted to do. “Finding running helped me find myself,” she said. “In this trail-running world, you’re celebrate for being a little kooky and a little different.”

Lucy Bartholomew

And even now, as an established professional ultra-runner, running is not only a job to Lucy Bartholomew. It is also a way to learn about life and herself. The greatest lesson running has taught her, is to focus on the things you can control and let go of the things you can’t control. “In life and in running, we tend to want to control everything,” she said. “But when you go into an ultra, you know a lot of things can happen. You know your stomach hurts, your ankle hurts. It’s more about what you can control but then also releasing the things you can’t.”

 

The recent COVID-19 outbreak put her mindset to the test, when Australia went into complete lockdown not only once, but twice. As the time one could spend outside was limited to one hour a day, there was suddenly a lot of time for things outside of running. She discovered that “Lucy, the runner” was not the only Lucy inside her. “I am Lucy who loves cooking, Lucy who loves reading, and I feel like it’s been a really cool thing to just expand on who I am.”

 

Although COVID-19 made planning impossible, Bartholomew looks at 2021 as a replication of what this year was supposed to be. “2021 is just a rerun of 2020. I feel like I’ve just been gifted 365 more days of training”, she said. She plans to run both the Western States 100Miler and the Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc—the two most prestigious races in the ultramarathon world. But she will also make a quick side-trip to the world of long-distance triathlon with an Ironman at the end of next year. During the lockdown, it has been a challenge to get in running or cycling workouts, but it has been nearly impossible to go for a swim. “I haven’t been swimming, but the pool is open today, so I booked in for tomorrow. I’m so excited I might wear my goggles to bed.”

 

Looking further ahead, Bartholomew wants to organize running camps. Next to working on a vegan cookbook, she has offered camps in Australia and South Africa so far. “I love bringing people together that share the passion of running or the passion of plant-based foods. I want to show people that it’s OK to just chill out for a weekend and to have a conversation where you look someone in the eye and fully listen to them. I think the art of conversation is getting lost these days.”

 

For the time after the pandemic, Bartholomew has some more running camps in America and Europe in mind to share her passion for running, food and good conversations.

Lucy Bartholomew
Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 
Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022

Race Without a Winner: Navigating (Mental) Health Through the Pandemic

Edit
Click here to add content.

Race Without a Winner: Navigating (Mental) Health Through the Pandemic

Click here to read in German/Hier geht es zur deutschen Version

 

“In my head I worked out all the obstacles I’d been through and put them in a figurative cookie jar. And in hard times, I reach in and pull out perspective and resilience,” said Olympic track cyclist Holly Edmondston. “And yeah, I have a lot of cookies.”

 

The COVID-19 pandemic contributed to her cookie jar in many ways: lockdown, canceled races, and personal health problems. Being from New Zealand, Edmondston was confronted with two options: leaving her country to race overseas or staying in the “promised land of no covid”. Since March 2020, New Zealand’s borders have been closed, keeping covid out but the people in.

 

“I didn’t ride a race in the two years before the Olympic Games,” Edmondston said. Because most competitions were canceled or rescheduled, New Zealand’s riders received the same pay as the year before. “Financially it didn’t hinder us at all, because we weren’t going anywhere.”

Holly Edmondston
Holly Edmondston representing New Zealand as a track cyclist.

For Franziska Reng, runner-turned-triathlete from Germany, the COVID-19 pandemic hit right during her transition between the two sports. After two years of battling sickness, she had to quit professional running and picked up triathlon–just to see one competition after another being canceled.

 

“I would say it was another small setback, but in retrospect it wasn’t only bad for me,” Reng said, who represented Germany as a junior cross country and track runner. Even after she quit running, the financial reserves she had built from sponsorship contracts and German sports aid carried her through 2020.

 

The pandemic also gave her time to set a new course in her career. In her job as a freelance journalist and author, she has enough freedom to balance triathlon training, racing, and working on passion projects such as her print magazine “Podium”.

 

“A lot has changed in my life over the last three years,” Reng said. “It’s not like I was doing bad before and now I’m doing better. My everyday life is just different now and I think different thoughts. It’s good to see that change is just part of life.”

 

When Reng was diagnosed with a complicated gastrointestinal disorder in 2018, her life changed drastically. She had recently become the German half marathon champion and was preparing for the European Championships when she started suffering stomach pains and nausea. One night she woke up with extreme pain and called her dad, a gastroenterologist, to run a few tests on her. The results showed severe bowel obstruction caused by intestinal malrotation.

 

“It would have been reckless to continue professional running with a diagnosis like that,” Reng said. She tried to keep going for a bit, but quickly reached her limits as she noticed that her body didn’t recover as it used to. “In 2019, I found myself in a sort of personal crisis that didn’t only involve physical problems, but also affected my mental health.”

Franzi Reng
Franzi Reng switched from running to triathlon during the pandemic. photo credit: Marcel Hilger

While Reng had people around her who supported her throughout those times, Edmondston was left to her own devices when she injured her back in August 2017.

 

“I had to pull out of all these competitions and I got kind of phased from the team,” she said. The team culture was less supportive and more competitive. If one rider was injured, it meant that the selection spots for competitions were given to fewer riders, which increases the likelihood of going to the Commonwealth Games or other international events.

 

It took half a year before Edmondston rode properly again. “It was super hard getting back on the bike,” she said.

 

A year later, her cycling career went over another road bump. When she started getting stomach pains and nausea, riding and racing became increasingly difficult. A few months later, she got diagnosed with endometriosis.

 

“I think it was the end of 2019 when I had laparoscopy to get rid of the endometriosis,” she said. “And I was like, crap, it’s only six months until the Olympic Games, it’s going to be a bit of a stretch to get recovered in time.”

 

Then COVID-19 hit and gifted her with one more year to recover. But even after her endometriosis surgery, she was still battling a lot of bloating and nausea.

 

“The selections for the Olympics weren’t good on my mental health,” she said. The coaches announced to each rider individually that another cyclist was selected to add more depth to the team. Even though she had earned her spot on the Olympic team, Edmondston was told that she wouldn’t be capable of competing in both the omnium and team pursuit because of her nausea struggles and her spot would be given to the 6th rider.

 

“I had been building towards these games since I was just a dreaming ten-year-old,” she said. Edmondston came to the conclusion that her nausea and fatigue had a reason beyond endometriosis: an anxiety disorder that had developed from the years of accumulated stress caused by her lifestyle and profession. “The closer to the Games I was getting, I was like, I don’t care. There was no joy, no anger, just kind of emptiness.”

 

When Edmondston received her anxiety disorder diagnosis in March 2021, her psychologist also recommended taking medication to increase her serotonin levels. A few weeks later, she felt the emotions coming back and her stomach issues receding.

 

Reng took a different way to improve her mental health. Right at the beginning of the pandemic, she packed her things and drove to her parent’s house at the Lake of Garda in Italy, where she spent almost one month to focus on her training. 

Franzi Reng
Franzi Reng is now working towards new goals in a new sport. (photo credit: Marcel Hilger)

“I finally found some kind of peace and for the first time, I was able to switch off and distance myself from all the stress of the last year,” she said.

 

When some countries in Europe started closing their borders, Reng knew it was time to return home. Germany locked down over April and May, which meant a lot of staying home and social distancing.

 

“I wasn’t doing well because I was living on my own. I started doubting myself and what I was doing,” Reng said. Her work as a freelance writer had become “non-essential” in the pandemic. “I write about sports. But sports didn’t happen.”

 

There were no competitions to write about and no races to race. But when she met her new boyfriend in May, things started looking a bit brighter. “I suddenly had someone who gave me a lot of support. That’s when I decided to use the lockdown to collect miles and make progress in my triathlon journey.”

 

She realized that switching to triathlon was the right decision, even in the absence of competitions. After all, it’s important to like the day-to-day routine of training. “I don’t need races to validate my performance. I know that I’ll keep cycling, running, and swimming until I feel that I’m done.”

 

Reng’s source of motivation is her passion for the sport and doing what she loves. The struggles with her gastrointestinal disorder showed her that being happy with her own body is the most important thing.

 

Edmondston came to a similar conclusion after recovering from endometriosis and an anxiety disorder, while fighting for her spot on the Olympic team. She had to prove that she was physically strong and mentally capable to race in both the omnium and the team because her coaches didn’t believe she could do it. “And then on race day, it was perfectly clear that I was the right choice.”

Holly Edmondston
Holly Edmondston competing at the 2021 Olympics.

Edmondston placed tenth in the Omnium while her team placed eighth out of eight in the pursuit, still breaking their national record. To return to New Zealand, all Olympic athletes had to quarantine in MIQ (Managed Isolation Quarantine) for two weeks. On the plane back home, Edmondston and her team learned that a childhood friend and teammate had committed suicide after the Olympics.

 

“I haven’t been back to the velodrome and the training headquarters, and I haven’t seen anyone in person since the Games. I don’t have much direction and I didn’t really feel like getting on my bike again,” she said. On top of going through the trauma of losing a teammate, New Zealand’s riders got a pay cut of $1,000 a month after the Olympics, which means they are being paid below their nation’s minimum wage.

 

“All the drama in the past was completely avoidable. So much heartache was created from selections,” she said and suggests a selection panel of individuals from outside the sport to foster a fairer environment. She also speaks up about paying athletes a livable wage that allows them to focus on their full time job–representing their country.

 

Edmondston used the time after the Olympics to grieve and reflect. She hasn’t touched her road bike for 10 weeks and is more focused on having fun on the mountain bike instead. But her passion for cycling is still burning. Traveling is what she loves most about the sport, which fuels her commitment for another Olympic cycle until 2024. “I love representing my country,” Edmondston said.

 

Reng’s intestinal malrotation diagnosis forced her to give up her professional running career, but she’s looking forward to representing Germany at the 70.3 World Championships next year. For her, triathlon is all about collecting experiences, especially experiences in international competitions.

 

“I’m far away from making money with triathlon,” Reng said. But that gives her the chance to go at her own pace. “I’m excited to race overseas again. I definitely question the race-and-travel culture of jetting around the globe. But on the other hand, competing with people from all around the world is part of sports.”

 

Edmondston is now looking at the possibility of joining a road cycling team alongside her track team in 2022. “I’m not fit right now, but I’ll keep riding. Like I said and will keep saying, I believe everything happens for a reason.”

Thanks to Franzi and Holly for the interview and making this article possible!

Race without a Winner

„In meinem Kopf habe ich alle Hindernisse, die ich überwunden habe, aufgeschrieben und in eine Keksdose gelegt. Und in schwierigen Zeiten kann ich hineingreifen und Perspektive und Widerstandsfähigkeit herausziehen“, sagt die Profi-Bahnradfahrerin Holly Edmondston. „Und ja, ich habe eine Menge Kekse.“

 

Die COVID-19-Pandemie trug in vielerlei Hinsicht zu ihrer Keksdose bei: Lockdown, abgesagte Rennen und gesundheitliche Probleme. Als Neuseeländerin war Edmondston mit zwei Optionen konfrontiert: ihr Land zu verlassen, um im Ausland Rennen zu fahren, oder im „gelobten Land ohne Corona“ zu bleiben. Seit März 2020 sind die neuseeländischen Grenzen geschlossen, was es selbst für Einwohner schwierig macht, zurück in ihr Land einzureisen.

 

„In den zwei Jahren vor den Olympischen Spielen bin ich kein einziges Rennen gefahren“, sagt Edmondston. Da die meisten Wettkämpfe abgesagt oder verschoben wurden, erhielten die Radfahrer im neuseeländischen Nationalteam den gleichen Lohn wie im Jahr zuvor. „Finanziell hat uns die Pandemie nicht so stark getroffen, weil wir ja zu keinen Wettkämpfen fahren mussten.“

Holly Edmondston
Holly Edmonston repräsentiert Neuseeland als Bahnradfahrerin.

Für Franziska Reng, Ex-Läuferin und jetzt Triathletin aus Deutschland, kam die Pandemie genau in der Zeit, als sie die Sportart wechselte. Nachdem sie zwei Jahre lang mit einer Darmkrankheit zu kämpfen hatte, musste sie den Profi-Laufsport aufgeben und begann mit dem Triathlon – nur um dann eine Wettkampfabsage nach der anderen zu erleben. 

 

„Ich würde sagen, das war ein weiterer kleiner Rückschlag, aber im Nachhinein war es nicht nur schlecht für mich“, sagte Reng, die als Läuferin international für Deutschland startete. Die finanziellen Reserven, die sie durch den Profi-Laufsport aufbauen konnte, trugen sie durch 2019 und 2020.

 

Die Pandemie gab ihr auch Zeit, um ihre Karriere neu auszurichten. In ihrem Job als freiberufliche Texterin und Autorin hat sie genug Freiraum, um Triathlon-Training, Wettkämpfe und Projekte wie ihrem Printmagazin „Podium“ unter einen Hut zu bringen.

 

„In den letzten drei Jahren hat sich in meinem Leben viel verändert“, sagt Reng. „Es ist nicht so, als wäre es mir vorher schlecht gegangen und jetzt geht es mir besser. Mein Alltag ist jetzt einfach anders und ich denke anders. Es ist gut zu sehen, dass Veränderungen einfach zum Leben dazugehören.“

 

Als bei Reng in 2018 eine komplizierte Magen-Darm-Erkrankung diagnostiziert wurde, änderte sich ihr Leben drastisch. Sie hatte gerade die deutschen Meisterschaften im Halbmarathon gewonnen und bereitete sich auf die Europameisterschaften vor, als sie starke Magenschmerzen und Übelkeit bekam. Eines Nachts wachte sie mit extremen Schmerzen auf und rief ihren Vater an, der ein Gastroenterologe ist, der ein paar Tests durchführte. Wenig später kam er mit der Diagnose „Darmverschluss“ zurück.

 

„Es wäre leichtsinnig gewesen, mit so einer Diagnose weiter Leistungssport zu machen”, sagt Reng. Nach ihrer Entlassung aus dem Krankenhaus versuchte sie für eine kurze Zeit, so weiter zu laufen, wie sie es gewohnt war. Sie stieß aber schnell an ihre Grenzen, als sie merkte, dass ihr Körper nicht mehr so schnell regeneriert wie früher. „In 2019 befand ich mich in einer Art Krise, wo es nicht nur um die Gesundheit ging, sondern auch um die Psyche.“

Franzi Reng
Franzi Reng wechselte während der Pandemie vom Laufen zum Triathlon.

Während Reng Menschen um sich hatte, die sie in dieser Zeit unterstützten, war Edmondston auf sich allein gestellt, als sie sich im August 2017 am Rücken verletzte.

 

„Ich musste viele Wettkämpfe absagen und wurde sozusagen kurzzeitig aus meinem Team ausgeschlossen“, sagte sie. Ihr Team weniger auf Unterstützung ausgerichtet und mehr auf Konkurrenz. Wenn eine Radfahrerin verletzt war, bedeutete dies, dass die Startplätze für Wettkämpfe an weniger Radfahrer vergeben werden, was die Wahrscheinlichkeit erhöht, an den Commonwealth Games oder anderen internationalen Veranstaltungen teilzunehmen.

 

Es dauerte ein halbes Jahr, bis Edmondston wieder richtig ins Training zurückkehren konnte. „Es war sehr schwer, wieder auf dem Sattel zu sitzen“, sagt sie.

 

Ein Jahr später erlebte ihre Radsportkarriere einen weiteren Rückschlag. Als sie anfing, mit Magenschmerzen und Übelkeit zu kämpfen, wurden das Training und Wettkämpfe immer schwieriger. Nach ein paar Monaten wurde bei ihr Endometriose diagnostiziert.

 

„Es war Ende 2019, als ich eine Laparoskopie hatte, um die Endometriose loszuwerden“, sagt sie. „Und ich dachte mir: Mist, es sind nur noch sechs Monate bis zu den Olympischen Spielen, es wird ein eng, rechtzeitig wieder gesund zu werden.“

 

Dann kam die Corona-Pandemie und gab ihr ein weiteres Jahr zur Genesung. Aber auch nach ihrer Endometriose-Operation hatte sie immer noch mit Blähungen und Übelkeit zu kämpfen.

 

„Die Auswahl für die Olympischen Spiele war nicht gut für meine mentale Gesundheit“, sagt sie. Die Trainer teilten jedem Sportler mit, dass ein weiterer Radfahrer ausgewählt wurde, um das Team zu verstärken. Obwohl sie sich ihren Platz in der Olympiamannschaft verdient hatte, wurde Edmondston gesagt, dass sie wegen ihrer Magenprobleme nicht in der Lage sei, sowohl am Omnium als auch an der Mannschaftsverfolgung teilzunehmen – ihr Platz würde an die sechste Fahrerin vergeben.

 

„Ich hatte auf diese Spiele hingearbeitet, seit ich nur ein träumendes zehnjähriges Mädchen war“, sagt sie. Nach weiterer Recherche kam Edmondston zu dem Schluss, dass ihre Übelkeit und Müdigkeit einen anderen Grund als die Endometriose hatten. „Je näher ich den Spielen kam, desto mehr waren sie mir egal. Da war keine Freude, keine Wut, nur eine Art Leere.“

 

Im März 2021 erhielt Edmondston die Diagnose „Angststörung“, die sich aus dem jahrelangen Stress durch ihren Beruf als Profisportlerin entwickelt hatte. Ihre Psychologin empfahl auch die Einnahme von Medikamenten, um ihren Serotoninspiegel zu erhöhen. Einige Wochen später spürte sie, wie die Emotionen zurückkamen und ihre Magenprobleme sich zurückgingen.

 

Reng wählte einen anderen Weg, um ihre mentale Gesundheit zu verbessern. Zu Beginn der Pandemie packte sie ihre Sachen und fuhr in das Haus ihrer Eltern am Gardasee in Italien, wo sie fast einen Monat verbrachte, um sich auf ihr Training zu konzentrieren. 

Franzi Reng
Franzi Reng bereitet sich nun auf neue Ziele in einem neuen Sport vor. (photo credit: Marcel Hilger)

„Ich kam dort endlich zur Ruhe und konnte zum ersten Mal abschalten und mich von dem ganzen Stress des letzten Jahres distanzieren“, sagt sie.

 

Als einige Länder in Europa begannen, ihre Grenzen zu schließen, wusste Reng, dass es Zeit war, nach Hause zurückzukehren. Deutschland schloss im April und Mai seine Grenzen, was bedeutete, dass sie viel zu Hause blieb und „Abstand hielt“.

 

„Da ging es mir richtig schlecht, weil ich alleine lebte. Ich begann an mir selbst zu zweifeln und an dem, was ich mache“, sagte Reng. Ihre Arbeit als freiberufliche Texterin war in der Pandemie nicht systemrelevant. „Ich schreibe über Sport. Aber Sport hat nicht stattgefunden.“

 

Es gab keine Wettkämpfe, über die man schreiben konnte, und keine Rennen, die man selbst machen konnte. Doch als sie im Mai ihren neuen Freund kennenlernte, begannen die Dinge etwas besser auszusehen. „Ab dem Moment war das für mich erträglich. Und da habe ich dann versucht, das Beste draus zu machen, den Lockdown dafür zu nutzen, Trainingsstunden, Trainings, Kilometer zu sammeln und mich weiterzuentwickeln.“

 

Sie erkannte, dass der Wechsel zum Triathlon die richtige Entscheidung war, auch wenn es keine Wettkämpfe gab. Schließlich ist es wichtig, die tägliche Trainingsroutine zu mögen. „Ich brauche keine Wettkämpfe, die mir meine Leistung bestätigen. Ich weiß, dass ich so lange Rad fahren, laufen und schwimmen werde, bis keinen Bock mehr habe.“

 

Rengs Motivationsquelle ist ihre Leidenschaft für den Sport und das zu tun, was sie liebt. Durch ihre Darmerkrankung hat sie außerdem gelernt, dass es ihr wichtig ist, mit ihrem eigenen Körper zufrieden zu sein. „Das war lange nicht der Fall. Für mich geht es einfach um eine innere Zufriedenheit und die bekomme ich durch den Sport.“

 

Edmondston kam zu einem ähnlichen Schluss, nachdem sie sich von ihrer Endometriose und der Angststörung erholt hatte. Als sie um ihren Platz in der Olympiamannschaft kämpfte, musste sie beweisen, dass sie körperlich stark genug und psychisch in der Lage ist, beide Wettkämpfe zu fahren, weil ihre Trainer ihr das nicht zugetraut hatten. „Und am Tag des Rennens war dann klar, dass ich die richtige Wahl war.“

Holly Edmondston
Holly Edmondston bei den olympischen Spielen in 2021.

Edmondston belegte im Omnium den zehnten Platz, während ihr Team in der Verfolgung den achten Platz belegte und damit einen neuen Landesrekord aufstellte. Um nach Neuseeland zurückzukehren, mussten alle Olympia-Rückkehrer zwei Wochen lang in MIQ (Managed Isolation Quarantine) in Quarantäne gehen. Auf dem Rückflug erfuhren Edmondston und ihr Team, dass eine Freundin und Teamkollegin nach den Olympischen Spielen Selbstmord begangen hatte.

 

„Ich war seitdem nicht mehr im Velodrom und im Trainingszentrum und habe seit den Spielen niemanden aus dem Team mehr persönlich gesehen. Mir fehlt momentan die Orientierung und ich habe eine Auszeit gebraucht“, sagte sie. Neben dem Tod einer Teamkollegin wurden dem neuseeländischen Nationalteam nach den Olympischen Spielen die Gehälter um 1.000 Dollar pro Monat gekürzt, was weniger als der Mindestlohn ist.

 

„Das ganze Drama war völlig vermeidbar. Die Auswahl der Athleten hat so viel Drama versuracht, das völlig vermeidbar war“, sagt sie und schlägt vor, ein Auswahlgremium mit Personen außerhalb des Sports einzusetzen, um ein faireres Umfeld zu schaffen. Die Athleten sollten außerdem ein angemessenes Gehalt erhalten, damit sie sich auf ihre eigentliche Aufgabe konzentrieren können: ihr Land zu vertreten.

 

Für Edmondston war die Zeit nach den Olympischen Spielen geprägt von Trauer und Reflektion. Sie hat ihr Rennrad seit zehn Wochen nicht mehr angerührt und hält sich stattdessen mit Mountainbiken fit. Aber ihre Leidenschaft für den Radsport ist trotzdem ungebrochen. Das Reisen ist das, was sie am meisten an ihrem Sport liebt, und damit ihre Motivation für weitere drei Jahre bis Paris 2024. „Ich liebe es, mein Land zu vertreten“, sagte Edmondston.

 

Rengs musste ihre Profi-Laufkarriere wegen ihrer Darmerkrankung aufgeben, aber sie freut sich darauf, Deutschland nächstes Jahr bei den 70.3-Weltmeisterschaften zu vertreten. Für sie geht es beim Triathlon vor allem darum, Erfahrungen zu sammeln – vor allem Erfahrungen bei internationalen Wettkämpfen.

 

„Ich bin weit davon entfernt, mit Triathlon Geld zu verdienen“, sagt Reng. Aber das gibt ihr die Möglichkeit, ihr eigenes Tempo zu gehen. „Ich freue mich darauf, wieder bei Wettkämpfen im Ausland zu starten. Ich stelle definitiv diesen Wettkampftourismus in Frage und um den Globus zu jetten. Aber auf der anderen Seite gehört es zum Sport, sich mit Menschen aus aller Welt zu messen.“

 

Edmondston überlegt sich, in 2022 neben ihrem Bahnteam auch für ein Straßenradteam zu starten. „Ich bin im Moment nicht fit, aber ich werde weiter Rad fahren. Wie ich schon sagte und immer wieder sagen werde, ich denke, dass alles aus einem bestimmten Grund geschieht.“

Vielen Dank an Franzi und Holly für das Interview! 

Post Tags

About The Author

I did my first triathlon on a pink kid’s bike with training wheels at six years old. That’s where my love for the sport was born, but it took another decade until I figured out that I wanted to combine my passions for sports and writing. 

 
Beyond Limits

Everything Endurance Sports. 

Disclaimer

All resources and information shared on this website are only for informational purposes and aren’t intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition or disease.

Copyright © 2022